Christian Conservatives Turn On Kuo

This is not surprising. They can't have their leadership in the Extreme Christian community threatened or ridiculed so they brush off the truth ab

This is not surprising. They can't have their leadership in the Extreme Christian community threatened or ridiculed so they brush off the truth about the way this administration feels about them. On Hardball, Tony Perkins looked sheepishly into the camera and said:

PERKINS: But I will say, I think there is a thread of truth in it, but it‘s not without gain. I mean, the evangelicals understand that they‘re not—they‘re not always welcomed in the administration, or in the Republican Party, for that matter. But we‘ve gotten quite a bit, I would say, in the last six years, under this president that are priorities for us.

The video is on Hardball's homepage now.

WaPo

Conservative religious leaders described themselves as shocked yesterday by a new book's charge that Bush administration staffers privately dismissed evangelical Christian political activists as "nuts" and "goofy." James Dobson, Charles W. Colson and other stalwarts of the conservative Christian movement defended the Bush administration and questioned the timing of the book's publication, a month before the midterm elections. Some suggested that Kuo had betrayed the White House.

"I feel sorry for him, because once you do something like this, you get your 15 minutes in the spotlight, but then after that nobody will touch you," said Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council, a Christian advocacy group in Washington. "These kiss-and-tell books do more damage to the author than to the people they attack."

Beginning in 2002, the White House held ostensibly "nonpartisan" conferences about the availability of federal grants for religious charities. But Kuo alleges that the events were, in fact, designed to help vulnerable Republican incumbents.

Ken Mehlman, then the White House director of political affairs and now chairman of the Republican National Committee, "loved the idea and gave us our marching orders" to hold meetings in 20 congressional districts, the book says...read on


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