Colbert Report: Monsanto's 'Amber Waves Of Frankengrain'

Monsanto swears it destroyed all its genetically modified wheat from 2005, and then just to make sure no one ever found the remains, they buried it in a field.

On the "Colbert Report" this week, Stephen Colbert addressed Monsanto's GMO wheat incident last week, which led to Japan and South Korea to suspended U.S. wheat imports, causing wheat futures to tumble.

Comparing wheat to zombies, Colbert called it “amber waves of frankengrain” and "the return of the walking bread." He even mocked Monsanto for claiming it is "mystified by the appearance of the wheat," noting that "at this point, [the wheat] can probably talk" and solve the whole mystery.

Colbert also mentioned that Monsanto could face criminal prosecution and a $1 million fine over the discovery of the wheat that hasn't yet been approved by the U.S. government, adding that it would be merely pocket change based on Monsanto’s profits.

Colbert was joined by science journalist Laurie Garrett to discuss the new strain of wheat, and what role it might play in the future of the maker of Agent Orange. She said that Monsanto has been “leaking” the fact that they may have been sabotaged, adding that "There's no reason seeds should survive in the soil for the last couple of years."

Colbert asked her if she thought GMOs were dangerous, and Garrett said that there was "probably" no threat to human health, leaving the question of what impact genetically modified foods could have on environmental health unanswered.

Part one is above, and part two, below, features the discussion with Laurie Garrett.

About Diane Sweet

Diane Sweet's picture
Senior Editor, Lives in a gerrymandered district in Michigan.

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