#Occupy Wall Street Round-up

On Thanksgiving day, Occupy LA had a message for President Obama, and donations of food poured into the group all day.Two stuffed turkeys also arrived from the Police Department. "Gifts from one of the commanders," one volunteer said.

On Thanksgiving day, Occupy LA had a message for President Obama, and donations of food poured into the group all day.Two stuffed turkeys also arrived from the Police Department. "Gifts from one of the commanders," one volunteer said.

Occupy Wal-Mart?

On Friday, November 25th, Occupy Seattle will join Occupy Tacoma, Occupy Bellingham and Occupy Everett in a statewide protest at Wal-Mart in Renton at 2:00pm.

With its long history of mistreating workers and suppliers, its recent announcement of significant cutbacks on employee health care, and its obscene profits, Wal-Mart is a prime example of how the 99% are suffering at the hands of the 1%. [...]

With $14.3 billion in profits in 2010, Wal-Mart still saw fit to eliminate health insurance coverage for part time employees, cut company contributions to employee health savings accounts by 50% and increase health care premiums 17% to 61% for over 2.1 million employees worldwide. According to an article in the Huffington Post, the average Wal-Mart worker makes $8.81 per hour, while the CEO makes $8990.00 per hour.

Telling signs of the economic disparity between the 1 percent, and the 99 percent via Daily Kos Labor:

Mr. Simon said Wal-Mart shoppers seemed especially worried about food prices — Wal-Mart’s food costs rose 4 percent over the last quarter, though it passed on “substantially less” to consumers via grocery prices.

“We hear from some shoppers that they believe it will be more difficult than ever to afford holiday meals for their families,” he said. “We understand their concern, and we see it every month in our customers’ purchasing behavior.”

Then that same New York Times article:

At the other end of the retail spectrum, Saks said Tuesday that its revenue had risen 5 percent, to $692.3 million, from the same quarter a year ago. Its same-store sales, sales for stores open at least a year, rose 5.8 percent.

“Full-price selling is at record levels,” Mr. Sadove said. “We’re now in a less promotional environment than we were before the recession.” [...]

Some areas where Saks had placed big inventory bets, like shoes, turned out particularly well in the quarter, he said.

In the pumps and slingbacks section of the Saks website, there are more shoes priced over $1,000 than under $200.

Occupy Our Homes has a planned day of Action coming up on December 6:

Occupy Our Homes is a movement that supports Americans who stand up to their banks. We believe everyone has a right to decent, affordable housing. We stand in solidarity with the Occupy Wall Street movement and with community organizations who help the 99% fight for their homes.

From Monique, a victim of bank foreclosure:

“It got cold in here one night. The next morning I called the gas company to have them light my furnace. The billing department told me that Century 21 (the real estate agency) had called them and told them they'd be the realtors for the house.” So White called U.S. Bank and found out that as of January 26, 2011 her house was sold. “I didn't find out until October 24,” White said, “I just feel betrayed. I feel like US Bank strung me along until the redemption period ran out and then they stole my house out from under me.”

Stories similar to Monique's pour into Occupy Our Homes.

About Diane Sweet

Diane Sweet's picture
Senior Editor, Lives in a gerrymandered district in Michigan.

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