PBS: Relief Workers Decry Living Conditions In South Sudan Refugee Camp

Watch Sudanese Seek Shelter in Swampy Refugee Camp on PBS. See more from PBS NewsHour. This video, from the PBS Blog "The Rundown," describes the plight of thousands of Sudanese refugees who fled violence in Blue Nile State only to face

Watch Sudanese Seek Shelter in Swampy Refugee Camp on PBS. See more from PBS NewsHour.

This video, from the PBS Blog "The Rundown," describes the plight of thousands of Sudanese refugees who fled violence in Blue Nile State only to face a humanitarian crisis in overcrowded camps in South Sudan.

Sudanese taking refuge in a tent camp in Jamam, South Sudan, may have escaped the fighting around their homes but are finding their plight is not over yet.

The refugees have traveled from the Blue Nile region along the border of Sudan and South Sudan to escape fighting between Sudanese government forces and the local army, which wants no influence from the North.

But the Jamam camp, where they have fled, is "not a safe place for them to be" either, said Peter Struijf of Oxfam, according to an Independent Television News report. "We are very worried about disease outbreaks. We need someone at a higher level to make a strategic decision to solve this problem once and for all and that probably means moving most people out of Jamam. If not all."

New refugees are arriving daily, and the camp has swelled to about 40,000 people. The U.N. refugee agency is working to move people to more stable areas, but the rainy season has washed out roads and makes it challenging to move large numbers by bus or truck.

"It wasn't a planned camp," explained Fredeeric Cussigh, head of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees' field office. "It was a self-created camp where refugees settled. It's a de facto camp rather than an organized camp."

One of the residents of the camp, Efendi Badi el-Tom, the head of the Ingessana people who live in the hill country of eastern Sudan, said he doesn't blame UNHCR. "I blame [Sudanese President] Omar al-Bashir because if he hadn't shot and bombed us, we would have avoided all this. We are mountain people. The Ingessana people want to go home and find peace and finish this terrible war. Our hearts are broken."

More Resources:

- A South Sudan country profile from UNHCR says there are about 105,000 refugees in the country and hundreds of thousands more South Sudanese who are moving from Sudan back to South Sudan now that the country is independent.


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- Bombings Spur Relocation of Sudanese Refugee Camp describes the urgency of relocating people from another camp in South Sudan that was too close to the border fighting.

- GlobalPost published a series of dispatches from another border hotspot, the Nuba Mountains.

- PRI's The World reports on how Khartoum, the capital of Sudan, is impacted by the splinter off of South Sudan.

- BBC has a timeline of key events in South Sudan's past.

About Diane Sweet

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Senior Editor, Lives in a gerrymandered district in Michigan.

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