March 30, 1965 - Another Inch Deeper.

March 30, 1965. In-depth look at the major stories of the day. Terrorist bombing of U.S. Embassy in Saigon. White House weighs retaliation options. HUAC turns its attention to the KKK and other domestic terrorist groups. Man convicted of robbery and murder and sentenced in absentia in 1920 turns up and faces trial 45 years later. And Charles De Gaulle launched tirade against French Scientists speaking English.

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This day in 1965 ran the gamut.

From reports regarding a terrorist bombing of the U.S. Embassy in Saigon, resulting in over 200 casualties and calls from Capitol Hill for retaliation. The White House was debating how to go about it. The Hawks in Congress called for an immediate bombing of Hanoi. The bottom line was; this was the first time the Viet Cong hit so close, and it created an embarrassing situation for the U.S. to deal with. How it would be handled would give some indication as to how long this conflict would go on for.

Elsewhere on Capitol Hill - The HUAC Hearings took a turn for extremist groups on this day. With approval given to commence an investigation of the KKK, Black Muslims and The Minutemen. A few protests were voiced, asking how come the KKK and not CORE or the NAACP were being investigated. The old "those Civil Rights groups are loaded with commies" mantra went echoing around the halls of Congress.

And today was the day The Freedom Of Information Act was introduced, bringing an immediate storm of controversy and condemnation from the White House, saying people didn't have the right to know certain things. The opposition thought transparency was a good thing for the Government. But it was also hinted LBJ might just veto the thing if it passed the House and Senate.

Charles De Gaulle issued a stinging denunciation of the French Scientific community. Not that they were screwing up, but that they were insisting on speaking English, especially when it came to International Conferences. Long an opponent of too much Americanization of Europe, the latest tirade from De Gaulle brought into focus the fact that, as much as he claimed to love America, he just hated the way we spoke, and ate food, and listened to music, and drove cars.

And finally, a story about LeRoy Dunlap, who was convicted of robbery and murder in absentia in 1920, since he escaped custody before trial. Dunlap was handed the Death Penalty and managed to evade the long arm of the law for some 45 years, assuming a new name and a new life in the process. Until 1964 when his true identity was discovered. Most everyone had forgotten the case and most of the documents associated with the trial had been long destroyed. But the wheels of justice insisted on grinding forward, so he entered a guilty plea with the proviso that his sentence be reduced to Manslaughter and he be given a prison term, rather than the death penalty. Dunlap, who was 64 and a Grandfather, was convicted and sentenced to from 2-20 years and was eligible for parole when he hit 66.

And that's how it rolled on this particular March 30th in 1965 as delivered over NBC Radio via their News In Review feature.

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