March 8, 1941 - Lease-Lend And Lofoten.

March 8, 1941. News of the day including British raid on the Norwegian island of Lofoten. Vote expected on Lease-Lend Bill. German reports sinking of British ships on the rise. German air attacks on Malta continue. Germany charges U.S. of attempting influence over Yugoslavia. Japanese Foreign Minister Matsuoka visits Berlin.

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News on this 556th day of War in 1941 began on a hopeful note. It was reported there were no air raids anywhere in the British Isles on this March 8th. Bad weather was said to be the saving grace. Even so, civilian deaths from the Blitz were mounting, with an estimated 789 killed and over 1,068 wounded for the month of February.

On an upbeat note - the raid on the German held Norwegian island of Lofoten was deemed a wild success, even if was played down in the British press, it was still lauded as "audacious" and such raids were looked forward to in the future.

Meanwhile, in Berlin. The Nazi press were busy blasting Washington in general and FDR in particular, charging the U.S. with attempting influence over Yugoslavia, something the White House had a chuckle over. Rumors were confirmed by the German Radio that Japanese Foreign Minister Matsuoka was indeed visiting Berlin, and they also reported the sinking of British ships was on the rise as well as continued air attacks on the British island of Malta.

Back in the States - On Capitol Hill, debate was finishing up over the Lease-Lend Bill and an amendment introduced by Sen. Norris of Nebraska stipulating that no Americans would be involved in any way, shape or form in a shooting war in Europe as a proviso for providing the much needed aid to Britain. Even though the amendment was admitted not to be legally binding, Norris introduced it as a feel-good or reassuring measure of America's desire not to get dragged into the war. The amendment was debated and finally defeated by way of Arkansas Senator Hattie Carroway who said such a provision wasn't practical and she had two sons in the Army who were willing to fight in Europe if need be. The Bill was expected to pass the Senate on this day.

And that's how this day went, this March 8th 1941 as reported by the NBC News Of The World.

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