McConnell Refuses To Answer Whether O'Donnell And Angle Are Qualified To Govern

Mitch McConnell might be trying to paint a happy face on the primary elections of candidates like Sharron Angle and Christine O'Donnell, but the fact that his only defense of them is basically "they won their primary races" when asked if they're
up

Mitch McConnell might be trying to paint a happy face on the primary elections of candidates like Sharron Angle and Christine O'Donnell, but the fact that his only defense of them is basically "they won their primary races" when asked if they're qualified to govern speaks volumes of what he really thinks of them. Other than attacking Democrats that was all he could give This Week's Christiane Amanpour when asked what their qualifications were.

AMANPOUR: Even -- even in your own state. And I want to ask you, actually, what are the qualifications are -- do these people have? For instance, what is Christine O'Donnell's qualification for actually governing? What is Sharron Angle's actual qualification for governing?

MCCONNELL: Well, they won the primary fair and square against real competition, and they emerged as the nominee. And Sharron Angle is running no worse than dead even against the majority leader of the Senate. I think that's pretty significant.

AMANPOUR: And you're not -- are you not afraid that they might be a turnoff...

(CROSSTALK)

MCCONNELL: Am I afraid of having more Republicans in the Senate? Of course not.

AMANPOUR: No, that wasn't the question. The question is, are you not afraid that their somewhat, one would say, some might say, bizarre statements, their sort of fringe quality might actually turn people off? I mean, for instance, what do you say about a Sharron Angle, who I know you just had a fundraiser for, who basically talks about enemies in Congress and talks -- and hints about, you know, armed rebellion to put them down? I mean, is that the kind of talk from a United States senator?

MCCONNELL: You know what most Americans think is extreme?

AMANPOUR: No, I'm asking you that question.

MCCONNELL: Well, I know.

(CROSSTALK)

MCCONNELL: I'm going to answer it. I'm going to answer it. What most Americans think is extreme is the kind of government we've been running for the last year-and-a-half. We've seen the government taken over banks, insurance companies, car companies, nationalizing the student loan business. We're on a path to double the national debt in five years and triple it in 10.

Most Americans think what's been happening around here for the last year-and-a-half is extreme, and they want to change it. And they know that the way to change it is to change the Congress, because you don't get to make policy unless you get elected.

AMANPOUR: But you didn't tell me what you think about those kinds of comments from people who want to be, you know, a senator. I mean, it's kind of bizarre, don't you agree?

MCCONNELL: I don't think the people of Nevada should be attacked for the choice they made in the primary. And the candidate is running dead even with the majority leader of the United States Senate. Obviously, the people of Nevada think that she's a very good candidate or she wouldn't be running even with someone of such power and significance.

About Heather

Comments

We welcome relevant, respectful comments. Please refer to our Terms of Service for information on our posting policy.