President Declares Nashville A Disaster Area; Federal Funds On Their Way

As you probably know, much of Nashville is still under water. I read somewhere they're calling this a "500 year flood." What that means is that a f

As you probably know, much of Nashville is still under water. I read somewhere they're calling this a "500 year flood."

What that means is that a flood like this is only expected to happen every 500 years. Gee, we seem to be getting an awful lot of weather problems that aren't supposed to happen, aren't we?

Let's send some good thoughts and anything you can spare to the agencies helping Nashville dig out from this horrible disaster. In the meantime, the federal disaster aid is exactly the reason we need those federal programs:

Today, according to the Office of the Press Secretary, President Obama "declared a major disaster exists in the State of Tennessee and ordered Federal aid to supplement State and local recovery efforts."19 people have died in Tennessee since the storms and flooding began and the death toll is expected to rise as the waters of the flooded Cumberland River recede.

Some of Nashville's most historic landmarks have been affected by the flooding including the Opryland Hotel where hundreds of people had to be evacuated, the Ryman Auditorium (original home of the Grand Ol' Opry) and the Country Music Hall of Fame.

Relatives of those affected in Tennessee have found it difficult to find news on television about the disaster. Some have turned to Twitter and Facebook to keep up with the ongoing news.

You can tune into livestreaming coverage from Nashville's NBC affiliate, WSMV-TV.The President's action will allow Federal funding for affected individuals in the counties of Cheatham, Davidson, Hickman and Williamson which includes Nashville and Franklin.

Nashville and areas surrounding the metropolitan area have incurred catastrophic flooding after receiving up to 20 inches of rain in some areas.

FEMA is still conducting damage surveys and more counties in Tennessee may be designated after the assessments are completed in the affected areas.

Residents affected by the flood can begin applying for help tomorrow by registering online at http://www.DisasterAssistance.gov or by calling 1-800-621-FEMA(3362) or 1-800-462-7585 (TTY) for the hearing and speech impaired. The toll-free telephone numbers will operate from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. (local time) seven days a week until further notice.

The Nashville Red Cross is accepting money donations. Another way you can help is by contactingHands on Nashville.

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