'Fold It Up Into A Paper Airplane And Throw It Out The Window'

After weeks of debate and failed votes, the Senate passed its immigration reform bill today 68-32—a vote that included 14 Republicans.

Supporters of immigration reform, which passed the Senate Thursday, are hopeful that the bill will also pass the House and provide a chance for citizenship to millions of immigrants in the country illegally.

After weeks of debate and failed votes, the Senate passed its immigration reform bill today 68-32—a vote that included 14 Republicans. The 11 million undocumented immigrants who would have a path (albeit it a long one) to citizenship, should the bill become law. However, it could still fail in the Republican-controlled House. Speaker John Boehner has said he won’t even bring the bill to the floor for a vote. Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT), an opponent of the bill, said immigration reform was destined for “the ash heap of history,” regardless of its victory in the Senate.

So, how does the House GOP really feel about the Immigration Bill?

Via NRO:

"Perhaps the one thing that’s certain about the House of Representatives and immigration is that the bill that just passed the Senate could never, ever pass the House. Indeed, it’s difficult to overstate how little regard Republicans there have for it, even with the border-security amendment added by Senators Bob Corker and John Hoeven.“Just like all the senators, I haven’t read it yet,” quips Representative Tim Huelskamp of Kansas. The House should “fold it up into a paper airplane and throw it out the window. Oh, is that not the right answer?” jokes Representative Mick Mulvaney of South Carolina. “The Senate is, at this point, irrelevant,” observes Representative Ted Poe of Texas, the chairman of the House immigration caucus.

“If you think that the House is going to cave and bring up the Senate bill,” Representative Devin Nunes of California says, “that is idiotic. Anyone who pushes that is just ultimately trying to kill immigration reform.”'

Ditto what Kos said, "Ultimately, it'll come down to whether enough Republicans want to stay in the electoral ballgame, or whether they're content to relegate themselves to permanent minority status."

About Diane Sweet

Diane Sweet's picture
Senior Editor, Lives in a gerrymandered district in Michigan.

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