Gingrich Blames Democrats Poor Polling Numbers On 'Radicalism' Of Obama, Reid And Pelosi

Newt Gingrich is in upside down land again with his explanation of why the generic Republican v. Democratic poll numbers are looking bad for Democrats right now; the Democrats are too "radical". Yeah, whatever you say there buddy. If they were

Newt Gingrich is in upside down land again with his explanation of why the generic Republican v. Democratic poll numbers are looking bad for Democrats right now; the Democrats are too "radical". Yeah, whatever you say there buddy. If they were actually being "radical" those poll numbers would be up, not down. They're down because they've failed to reverse the damage that's been done to this country from the last thirty years of the kind of policies that you've embraced. This guy just throws as much poo against the wall whenever he has a chance and sees what sticks and of course Greta Van Susteren is happy to help him along.

VAN SUSTEREN: Mr. Speaker, nice to see you, sir.

NEWT GINGRICH: Good to see you.

VAN SUSTEREN: All right, we're hearing an awful lot about these polls. They're looking grimmer and grimmer and grimmer for the Democrats all the time, which I'm sure doesn't disappoint you immensely. But what is going on with this enthusiasm gap between Democrats and Republicans?

GINGRICH: Well, I think part of it is the job-killing nature of the way the Democrats have handled the economy and the fact that the unemployment numbers have been so consistently bad. And part of it is that the radicalism of the Obama team and Pelosi and Reid has, in a strange way, depressed their side and truly aroused both independents and Republicans in a that you couldn't have predicted -- you know, when Obama came in, nobody would have predicted that they would be in the mood they're in after -- coming up on Labor Day, this weekend. And I think that...

VAN SUSTEREN: Where'd it go, though? I mean -- I mean, all the crowds and the enthusiasm, I mean, even their own base doesn't seem to be, like, you know, excited or -- I mean, where -- where's the Democratic enthusiasm?

GINGRICH: Seen by most Americans this is the most radical administration of modern times. And I think that that has actually split the Democratic Party. I think a substantial number of Democrats -- you know, in a poll this week in Ohio, 11 percent Democrats would have preferred George W. Bush to Obama as president. Now, that may not sound like much, but it was almost four times the number of Republicans who wanted Obama rather than Bush. And that kind of beginning to see their own party fall apart, on top of the independents deserting them while they've solidify the Republicans, I think means that this November will probably be very difficult for the Democrats.

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