Arizona Can't Have A Spanish Census Banner Flying

(Photo via Matt Hinshaw/The Daily Courier) Prescott, Arizona couldn't handle it. It was just too much for the Tom Tancredo-minded town folk. A Spa

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(Photo via Matt Hinshaw/The Daily Courier)

Prescott, Arizona couldn't handle it. It was just too much for the Tom Tancredo-minded town folk.

A Spanish-language banner encouraging people to participate in the census is gone from downtown Prescott after at least four dozen citizens and two city council members questioned its appropriateness.

The banner spanned Gurley Street next to Washington Traditional School, assuring Spanish-speaking people that the U.S. Census would protect their personal information for 72 years and noting that the census helps get federal money for local hospitals and streets.

A similar banner in English continues to hang over Gurley Street about a block farther west on Elks Hill. It does have two words in Spanish that translate to "make yourself count."

Council members Steve Blair and John Hanna were among those who questioned the need for the banner in Spanish. Blair said he received about 20 calls from people questioning the need for the sign, and Hanna said he fielded about 25 from unhappy people.

City of Prescott Executive Assistant Patty Crouse said she also fielded five or 10 calls from people angry about seeing a banner in Spanish near the entrance to the city.

Hanna said he personally didn't like the sign, either...read on

Hey, don't inform your citizens. Arthur Frommer is right. Don't travel there if you can help it.

For myself, without yet suggesting that others follow me in an open boycott, I will not personally travel in a state where civilians carry loaded weapons onto the sidewalks and as a means of political protest. I not only believe such practices are a threat to the future of our democracy, but I am firmly convinced that they would also endanger my own personal safety there. And therefore I will cancel any plans to vacation or otherwise visit in Arizona until I learn more. And I will begin thinking about whether tourists should safeguard themselves by avoiding stays in Arizona.

About John Amato

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