Scammers Gotta Scam: ACA Edition

Well, that didn't take long. Not even two weeks after the ink on the Supreme Court opinions dried, scammers are taking to the telephones to try and wheedle personal information out of people. And boy howdy, does this sound like a right wing scam to

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Well, that didn't take long. Not even two weeks after the ink on the Supreme Court opinions dried, scammers are taking to the telephones to try and wheedle personal information out of people. And boy howdy, does this sound like a right wing scam to not only screw people but also cast shadows on the ACA or what?

From the alert:

It's enough to make you sick. No sooner had the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on the Affordable Care Act than scam artists began working the phones. They say they're from the government and that, using the Affordable Care Act as a hook, they need to verify some information. They might have the routing number from your bank, and then use that information to get you to reveal the entire account number. Or, they'll ask for your credit card or Social Security number, Medicare ID, or other personal information.

The Federal Trade Commission, the nation's consumer protection agency, advises consumers not to give out personal or financial information in response to unsolicited phone calls, emails, or knocks on your door. Scam artists want your information to commit identity theft, charge your existing credit cards, debit your checking account, open new credit card, checking, or savings accounts, write fraudulent checks, or take out loans in your name.

If someone who claims to be from the government calls and asks for your personal information, hang up. It's a scam. The government and legitimate organizations you do business with already have the information they need and will not ask you for it. Then, file a complaint at ftc.gov or call 1-877-FTC-HELP. If you think your identity's been stolen, visit ftc.gov/idtheft or call 1-877-ID-THEFT. You also can file a complaint with your state Attorney General.

Here's what makes me think it's a winger scam, via IndyNews:

Citizens Energy Group and Indianapolis Power and Light Company said in a news release that a number of customers of both utilities have been contacted by someone telling them that a new federal program or "Obamacare" will pay for their utilities.

Customers have been contacted in person and through fliers, social media and text messaging, according to the Better Business Bureau.

The scammers are telling customers that Obama is providing credits if customers provide their Social Security and bank routing numbers.

In return, customers are given invalid bank information to use to pay their utility bills.

That sounds like the same kind of lame scam some idiot like James O'Keefe would dream up, doesn't it?

After all, who can forget the 2010 scam where cold callers claimed to be selling policies protecting elderly folks from "death panels" and "Obamacare policies"? Or this one, where the callers threatened to throw seniors in jail if they didn't have health insurance, which they didn't because they have Medicare, which is better than health insurance.

They prey on the poor and the elderly, and mask their "official-sounding" offer in clouds of confusion. If you know anyone who might fall prey to this, let them in on the secret.

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