Romney: Young People 'Have To Vote For Me'

Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney declared on Monday that "young voters in this country have to vote for me." During a press conference in Aston, Pennsylvania, the candidate told reporters that young Americans should

Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney declared on Monday that "young voters in this country have to vote for me."

During a press conference in Aston, Pennsylvania, the candidate told reporters that young Americans should reconsider their support for President Barack Obama.

"I think young voters in this country have to vote for me if they're really thinking about what's in the best interest of the country and what's in their personal best interests," he explained. "Because the president's policies have led to extraordinary statistics. And when you look at 50 percent of the kids coming out of college today can't find a job or can't find a job that is consistent with their skills. How in the world can you be supporting a president that's led to that kind of economy?"

"I think that young people will understand that ours is the party of opportunity and jobs," the former Massachusetts governor continued. "If they want to have a president that can create good jobs and can allow them to find them a bright and prosperous future for themselves and for their families then I hope their going to vote for me."

"I think this is a time when young people are questioning the support they gave to President Obama three and a half years ago. He promised bringing the country together. That sure hasn't happened. He promised a future with good jobs and good opportunity. That hasn't happened."

After the press conference ended, Romney returned the the microphone and added that he "fully" supported an extension of low interest rates on student loans, a position that puts him in opposition to House Republicans.

"There was some concern that that would expire halfway through the year, and I support extending the temporary relief on interest rates for students as a result of student loans, obviously, in part because of the extraordinarily poor conditions in the job market."

A recent survey by the Public Religion Research Institute found that 48 percent of voters aged 18 to 24 support a second term for Obama, compared with 41 percent who would like to see a Republican in the White House.

In 2008, Obama won the age group by 34 points over Sen. John McCain (R-AZ).

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