American Rights At Work Exposes Ridiculousness Of Conservative Critics With 'It's Just A Poster' Video

In a new video released last week, pro-labor organization American Rights at Work takes on the ridiculous arguments anti-labor organizations are using to attack the recent rule issued by the National Labor Relations Board that requires employers

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In a new video released last week, pro-labor organization American Rights at Work takes on the ridiculous arguments anti-labor organizations are using to attack the recent rule issued by the National Labor Relations Board that requires employers to hang posters that inform workers of their rights under the National Labor Relations Act. The humorous video shows the absurdity of the slippery slope claims organizations like the National Federation of Independent Business is making about the potential effects of the poster. A blog post from American Rights at Work about the new video says:

This August the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) issued a rule that requires private sector employers to post a notice advising employees of their rights under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA)—rights they’ve had for more than 70 years. Like other notices of workplace laws regarding safety and health, compensation, and discrimination, the poster raises awareness without unduly burdening employers.

But anti-worker politicians and corporate interest groups are up in arms over this modest step forward for everyday Americans. So we put together this short video on the poster to expose the right-wing hysteria for what it really is: political theater intended to undermine even the most basic protections for the 99 percent.

The right-wing pundits featured in our video have tried to make the argument that this simple poster will kill jobs and threaten our economic recovery, even though small business owners blame low consumer spending for their hesitance to create jobs—not regulations like this one. As for the millions of employees struggling to make ends meet in this upside down economy, knowing their rights to form a union and bargain collectively for a better life has never been more important.

The quotes featured in the video include:

  • "A punitive new rule..." Karen Harned of the National Federation of Independent Business
  • "Just when we thought we had seen it all from the NLRB, it has reached new low it its zeal to punish small-business owners." Harned again
  • "This is nothing more than labor regulation run amok," Robin Conrad of the National; Chamber Litigation Center
  • "The National Labor Relations Board is making sure that unemployment remains high in America," Diana Furchtgott-Roth of the Manhattan Institute
  • "The NLRB has...required that employers litter their workplaces with guidelines for unionization," Gary Shapiro of the Consumer Electronics Association
  • "...the NLRB is causing great uncertainty among manufacturers at a time when our economy is struggling to recover," Jay Timmons of the National Association of Manufacturers
  • "It's unnecessary, needlessly provocative and will only serve to create division rather than cooperation between small-business owners and their employees," Farrell Quinlan of the National Federation of Independent Business

So, in summary, anti-labor groups would have you believe that hanging a poster is punitive punishment litter that is government run amok in an effort to keep unemployment high and creates certainty among manufacturers. And that it is provocative to inform employees of rights they've had for 70 years. Much like it is provocative for teachers to educate their students about the Bill of Rights, I'm guessing. The idea that the posters are divisive is also ridiculous. The 1 percent and the 99 percent are already divided and it was the 1 percent that did the dividing, not a poster.

About Kenneth Quinnell

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