Variety Of Tax Day Rallies Across The Nation Focused On Holding The One Percent Accountable

Tax dodger dodgeball in Clinton Square in Syracuse. A series of rallies was held across the nation on Tuesday in honor of national tax day. A variety of events across the nation used creative methods to focus on issues related to holding the

[oldembed width="425" height="300" src="http://c.brightcove.com/services/viewer/federated_f9?isVid=1" flashvars="videoId=1567129052001&playerID=650412371001&playerKey=AQ~~,AAAAPLpuTok~,Mq6Bf5KTh4AWiWybEmU_mGVR7_83kiVA&domain=embed&dynamicStreaming=true" resize="1" fid="22"]

Tax dodger dodgeball in Clinton Square in Syracuse.

A series of rallies was held across the nation on Tuesday in honor of national tax day. A variety of events across the nation used creative methods to focus on issues related to holding the one percent more accountable.

SEIU President Mary Kay Henry said:

"Our country's lopsided tax structure has fueled the most drastic income inequality in history. On this tax day, working people are rightly frustrated with a system that has failed to live up to our nation's ideals of widespread opportunity and instead rewards the rich and corporations with huge tax breaks and loopholes - sometimes even for sending jobs overseas.

"The fact that most millionaires pay a smaller percentage of their income in taxes than the average worker runs contrary to our country's ideals of fairness and equality. Corporate income taxes account for a tiny 1 percent of the nation's GDP, but some of our nation's policy makers tell working people that, in spite of historically low tax rates, the wealthy few and corporations pay 'too much' and if we just allow them to keep more of their wealth, eventually the rest of us will benefit. This trickle-down theory has never worked, and now working people-the 99 percent-are rightly taking a stand and saying 'enough is enough.'

"Just yesterday, U.S. senators had a chance to stand with the 99 percent by passing the Buffett Rule, which calls on millionaires to pay their fair share. A group of Senators blocked the bill even though poll after poll shows that the public favors eliminating tax giveaways for the rich. Those who voted against this bill owe their constituents an explanation.

"Workers are rallying today because they fundamentally believe that we all have a responsibility to invest in our nation's prosperity - including corporations and the rich. But it's a bitter pill to swallow when the system is rigged to allow corporations to dodge paying taxes, while home care workers, janitors, sanitation workers and other working people are falling behind and struggling to support their families."

Some of the more notable events:

  • In Syracuse, New York, SEIU held a 'Tax Dodger Dodgeball' game in public space and the Syracuse Peace Council conducted a "penny poll" on federal spending priorities.
  • In Washington, D.C., a coalition of groups protested outside Grover Norquist's office. “Grover thinks that tax breaks for millionaires are more important than fixing America’s crumbling infrastructure” said Eric Shoanberg of Responsible Wealth.
  • In Sacramento, a "Tax Wealth, Not Work" rally was held.
  • In Ames, Iowa, the rally focused on calling out Rep. Steve King (R) for his support of the Paul Ryan budget proposal.
  • In Raleigh, N.C., activists targeted Bank of America for dodging its responsibilities to the community.
  • In Seattle, citizens marched on Wells Fargo to "foreclose" on them for nonpayment of taxes.
  • In Miami, activists set up a "Walk of Shame" of the city and country's biggest tax dodgers.
  • In Florida, constituents held a prayer vigil outside Sen. Marco Rubio's office in protest of his opposition to the Buffet Rule.
  • In Los Angeles, janitors stopped traffic for 30 minutes before taking their concerns to Chase bank.
  • At Mitt Romney/Donald Trump event, a team of "tax dodgers," in full uniform, protested and carried hula hoops bearing "loophole" banners.
  • In Chicago, Citizen Tax Enforcers visited CME and GE, demanding they pay their fair share.
  • About Kenneth Quinnell

    Comments

    We welcome relevant, respectful comments. Please refer to our Terms of Service for information on our posting policy.