Dems Warn Obama: We'll Oppose Any Social Security Cuts

I keep waiting: Is this the time the Dems really, really mean it? Is this the time they stand up for the needy and vulnerable? Maybe. Because this time, they don't have to worry about Obama's reelection - but they do have to worry about their

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I keep waiting: Is this the time the Dems really, really mean it? Is this the time they stand up for the needy and vulnerable? Maybe. Because this time, they don't have to worry about Obama's reelection - but they do have to worry about their own:

President Barack Obama may find opposition from inside his own party if he is serious about making changes to the way Social Security benefits are distributed in order to pass a deal to replace sequestration.

A majority of the House Democrats -- 107 members -- sent Obama a letter on Friday stating that any changes to entitlements will be opposed by members of his own party.

"We remain deeply opposed to proposals to reduce Social Security benefits through use of the chained CPI to calculate cost-of-living adjustments," reads the letter, which was the idea of Reps. Jan Schakowsky (D-Ill.), Keith Ellison (D-Minn.), Raul Grijalva (D-Ariz.), John Conyers (D-Mich.) and Donna Edwards (D-Md.).

White House Press Secretary Jay Carney recently said the president would be open to implementing chained Consumer Price Index (CPI), which would alter the annual adjustment in how benefits are paid to Social Security recipients by using a less generous baseline of inflation.

"He has put forward a technical change, as part of a big deal," said Carney. "A technical change of CPI is possible as part of a big deal."

He added, however, that the president is opposed to raising the eligibility age of Medicare.

Progressives have opposed chained CPI because it would reduce the benefits that senior citizens receive.

The letter stated that while House Democrats are "committed to making the changes that will extend solvency for 75 years," Social Security has not negatively contributed to any of the country's fiscal problems so "it should not be on the bargaining table."

House Democrats reiterated in the letter their "vigorous opposition to cutting Social Security, Medicare, or Medicaid benefits in any final bill."

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