New PA Law Lets Doctors Know What Chemicals Are Killing You - But They're Not Allowed To Tell You

My home state is fast approaching Wisconsin for sheer right-wing nuttery, especially when it comes to the energy industry. Gov. Tom Corbett, whose campaign was largely underwritten by the energy industry, has gone out of his way to see that the

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My home state is fast approaching Wisconsin for sheer right-wing nuttery, especially when it comes to the energy industry. Gov. Tom Corbett, whose campaign was largely underwritten by the energy industry, has gone out of his way to see that the frackers reign supreme - especially when it comes to the health of Pennsylvania residents:

Under a new law, doctors in Pennsylvania can access information about chemicals used in natural gas extraction—but they won't be able to share it with their patients. A provision buried in a law passed last month is drawing scrutiny from the public health and environmental community, who argue that it will "gag" doctors who want to raise concerns related to oil and gas extraction with the people they treat and the general public.

[...] There is good reason to be curious about exactly what's in those fluids. A 2010 congressional investigation revealed that Halliburton and other fracking companies had used 32 million gallons of diesel products, which include toxic chemicals like benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene, in the fluids they inject into the ground. Low levels of exposure to those chemicals can trigger acute effects like headaches, dizziness, and drowsiness, while higher levels of exposure can cause cancer.

The EPA has tried to get these companies to voluntarily disclose which chemicals they use, but of course they refuse, insisting it's a "proprietary formula" and thus protected.

Pennsylvania law states that companies must disclose the identity and amount of any chemicals used in fracking fluids to any health professional that requests that information in order to diagnosis or treat a patient that may have been exposed to a hazardous chemical. But the provision in the new bill requires those health professionals to sign a confidentiality agreement stating that they will not disclose that information to anyone else—not even the person they're trying to treat.

"The whole goal of medical community is to protect public health," said David Masur, director of PennEnvironment. He worries that the threat of a lawsuit from a big industry player like Halliburton or ExxonMobil for violating a confidentiality agreement could scare doctors away from research on potential impacts in the state. "If anything, we need more concrete information. This just stifles another way the public could have access to information from experts."

Here's the interesting part: The provision was never in the original version. It was stuck in the final version that was reconciled in conference, which sure seems to indicate someone didn't want much attention:

The provision was not in the initial versions of the law debated in the state Senate or House in February; it was added in during conference between the two chambers, said State Senator Daylin Leach (D), which meant that many lawmakers did not even notice that this "broad, very troubling provision" had been added. "The importance of keeping it as proprietary secret seems minimal when compared to letting the public know what chemicals they and their children are being exposed to," Leach told Mother Jones.

The limits on what doctors can say about those chemicals makes it impossible to either assuage or affirm the public's concerns about health impacts. "People are claiming that animals are dying and people are getting sick in clusters around [drilling wells], but we can't really study it because we can't see what's actually in the product," said Leach.

For what other possible reason does this provision exist, if not to allow the energy companies to rape and pillage to their hearts' content?

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