Remember Those Automatic Defense Cuts? Looking Pretty Darned Unlikely!

(h/t Mark Fiore) Now, you knew they weren't going to allow any more cuts to the military, right? They'll tie themselves in knots to cut anything but. And why the hell are we talking about deficit reduction during a depression, anyway? (Call it

[oldembed width="425" height="344" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/wu1X6T5DThk?hl=en&fs=1" resize="1" fid="1"] (h/t Mark Fiore)

Now, you knew they weren't going to allow any more cuts to the military, right? They'll tie themselves in knots to cut anything but. And why the hell are we talking about deficit reduction during a depression, anyway? (Call it a recession if you want, but I don't agree.) So if there's one thing we can count on, it's that any deep cuts will come out of things that benefit people like us, because Democrats are compulsively cooperative with their oppressors:

WASHINGTON — As pessimism mounted this week over the ability of a bipartisan Congressional committee to agree on a deficit-reduction plan, lawmakers began taking steps to head off the large cuts in Pentagon spending that would automatically result from the panel’s failure.

Members of both parties and both chambers said they increasingly feared that the 12-member committee would be unable to bridge deep partisan divisions and find $1.2 trillion in deficit reduction as required under the law that raised the debt ceiling and created the committee in the summer.

As talks sputtered, one panel member publicly lamented that the process was not working, and the group was chastised by a bipartisan group of budget experts (Editor's note: No progressive experts invited, of course!) at a public hearing for failing to show progress. Several members of Congress, especially Republicans on the House and Senate Armed Services Committees, are readying legislation that would undo the automatic across-the-board cuts totaling nearly $500 billion for military programs, or exchange them for cuts in other areas of the federal budget.

Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina, has drafted a bill that would replace the military reductions that would occur under a process known in Congress as sequestration with 5 percent cuts to other, unspecified parts of the federal budget, and a 10 percent decrease in pay for members of Congress. In the House, similar measures are being assembled.

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