Bob Herbert: While Iraq Burns

NT Times Select. (h/t Alisa) With no obvious personal stake in the war in Iraq, most Americans are indifferent to its consequences. In an interview l

NT Times Select. (h/t Alisa)

With no obvious personal stake in the war in Iraq, most Americans are indifferent to its consequences. In an interview last week, Alex Racheotes, a 19-year-old history major at Wesleyan University in Connecticut, said: "I definitely don't know anyone who would want to fight in Iraq. But beyond that, I get the feeling that most people at school don't even think about the war. They're more concerned with what grade they got on yesterday's test."

His thoughts were echoed by other students, including John Cafarelli, a 19-year-old sophomore at the University of New Hampshire, who was asked if he had any friends who would be willing to join the Army. "No, definitely not," he said. "None of my friends even really care about what's going on in Iraq."

While shoppers here are scrambling to put the perfect touch to their holidays with the purchase of a giant flat-screen TV or a PlayStation 3, the news out of Baghdad is of a society in the midst of a meltdown.

As a teenager---even though I was too young to be eligible---all we talked about was what number came up in the draft. A friend who lived across the street came running over to me after the results had been posted in the newspaper and his birthday was #1 on the list. He had two years to go before he could be drafted, but we tried to figure what position his birthday would be when his time was up. How times have changed.


About John Amato

Comments

We welcome relevant, respectful comments. Please refer to our Terms of Service for information on our posting policy.