Karl Rove Blames Obama Administration For Problems With Hoboken Storm Funding

Karl Rove with Fox's latest spin doing damage control for the Christie administration.
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As usual, it's upside down land over at Fox "news." Not to be outdone by his counterparts on the Sunday bobblehead shows, Karl Rove took to the airways this Monday, and read straight from the Christie administration talking points, attacking the mayor of Hoboken, Dawn Zimmer and then took it a step further and blamed the Obama administration for the problems with her city failing to receive the requested funds following Hurricane Sandy.

ROVE: We're talking here about a $100 million grant that she wants for flood development that comes out of a special pot of federal money that's $400 million and the communities in New Jersey have applied for $1.8 billion in funds. So there are more applications for this money than there are... than there is money, and this is money that is not at the beck and call of the governor.

The state has a role to play in this, but the final decision as to who is going to get this money and how much they're going to get is going to be made in Washington, not in Trenton, be made by the Obama administration, not the Christie administration.

Rove has things exactly backwards of course. The $70 million that Rove was touting during this segment that the city had already received was the money that was not under the control of the Christie administration:

As Zimmer explained to CNN:

Zimmer, however, had a different account of allocated funds. She said the $70 million given to Hoboken was through flood insurance and other mechanisms that did not need approval from the state. She received only $300,000 in Christie-approved funds, she said.

The $142,000 that the city received, despite the request for $100 million, is from the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program, and, as explained on FEMA's web site, that money is administered by the state, and not the Obama administration:

How do I apply for the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program?

Following a disaster declaration, the state will advertise that Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) funding is available to fund mitigation projects in the state. Those interested in applying to the HMGP should contact their local government to begin the application process. Local governments should contact their State Hazard Mitigation Officer. [...]


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How are potential projects selected and identified?

The state's administrative plan governs how projects are selected for funding. However, proposed projects must meet certain minimum criteria. These criteria are designed to ensure that the most cost-effective and appropriate projects are selected for funding. Both the law and the regulations require that the projects are part of an overall mitigation strategy for the disaster area. The state prioritizes and selects project applications developed and submitted by local jurisdictions. The state forwards applications consistent with state mitigation planning objectives to FEMA for eligibility review. Funding for this grant program is limited and states and local communities must make difficult decisions as to the most effective use of grant funds.

How long will it take to get my project approved?

It is important for applicants to understand the approval process. Once eligible projects are selected by the state, they are forwarded to the FEMA Regional Office where they are reviewed to ensure compliance with federal laws and regulations. One such law is the National Environmental Policy Act, passed by Congress in 1970, which requires FEMA to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of each proposed project. The time required for the environmental review depends on the complexity of the project.

Why Didn't I Receive Hazard Mitigation Grant Program Funds When Some Of My Neighbors Did?

The Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) is administered by the state, which prioritizes and selects project applications developed and submitted by local jurisdictions. The state forwards applications consistent with state mitigation planning objectives to FEMA for eligibility review. Although individuals may not apply directly to the state for assistance, local governments may sponsor an application on their behalf. Funding for the grant program is limited and states and local communities must make difficult decisions as to the most effective use of available grant funds.

And of course no segment on Fox would be complete without them screaming BENGHAZI.... IRS....!! That was apparently Scott Brown's job today. Before they're done twisting this story around, they'll have members of the Obama administration trying to shake down the mayor of Hoboken.

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