Ken Starr Nixes Idea Of Special Prosecutor Over The Cost Of 'Office Space'

The highly controversial and former special prosecutor tasked to find some way to impeach Bill Clinton Ken Starr is now too concerned with start-up costs and finding office space to be in favor of installing a special prosecutor to investigate possible ties between Russia and Trump's campaign.

Let that sink in. Starr was initially brought on to investigate Whitewater real estate deal (in which the Clintons lost money) to see if there was evidence of wrongdoing. After months of investigations, jailing of witnesses and tens of millions of dollars only to find nothing and asking Congress to allow him to expand the investigation to any wrongdoing, including about lying to Congress about a consensual extramarital affair, allowing him to air all manner of speculative and spurious rumors to smear the Clinton name.

But a hostile foreign entity colluding with a candidate for the highest office in the nation? Undermining our elections and democracy? Major conflicts of interests with a brutal, murderous dictator? Meh.

On ABC's This Week, Harvard Constitutional Law professor Laurence Tribe, told host George Stephanopoulos he believes Trump should be impeached because his actions have been like that of a king, monarch or a dictator.

Tribe wrote an op-ed in the today's Washington Post called "Trump must be impeached. Here’s why."

Tribe told Stephanopoulos, "This president has shown that he cannot be trusted to remain within the law and our constitution's last resort for situations of that kind is to get the person out of office."

Ken Starr responded by saying we should let the terrific people at the FBI do their job, "it's a terrific guard rail. There are checks and balances in our system. And so let's allow the system to work."

Stephanopoulos asked if we need a special prosecutor because the newly appointed Deputy AG Rod Rosenstein was tasked by Trump to come up with excuses to fire Comey.

Stephanopoulos asked, "Does that call into question his independence? And should he be pointing a special counsel?"

Starr disagreed and then made a list of bizarre excuses why setting up a special counsel was a bad idea.


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Starr said, "And I'll just say this, there's some huge costs. And I think the nation knows this. With the appointment of a special prosecutor. The first is delay. A special prosecutor, a special counsel, is a startup operation. He or she has nothing, absolutely nothing. Got to go get office space, among other things."

Say what? Huge costs to getting office space. Is he kidding me? What's next, bitching about the high price of copy paper?

Starr continued, "So, let's trust our guardrails, let's trust the checks and balances that we have, especially with the Senate intelligence committee."

Tribe replied by saying, "Trust is not what the framers of the United States constitution and of this country relied on."

He continued, "We have a president who himself says 'trust me.' He does not accept the boundaries of law. He basically says that if anybody gets too close for comfort, I'm going to get rid of them. And as long as that's in place, we cannot afford as a country to put our fate in the hands of someone so whimsical and so unpredictable."

"The idea that it might take some time to get office space, my goodness, when we are at the very verge of having the fundamentals of our system collapse, we can afford some office space," he said.

It's very disappointing that ABC News decided Ken Starr was worthy of getting air time to discuss this topic after being demoted and then resigning his job at Baylor University for how he handled sexual assault complaints.

And then listening to the man denouncing the need for a special prosecutor was rich too. He knows only too well the power the position holds since he leaked more information to his right wing allies and the media while being the special prosecutor.

America doesn't trust Congress to uphold the law when it comes to these investigations.

That's why in a new NBC/WSJ poll, 78% of Americans support an independent commission or special prosecutor.

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