Forbes On Fox Panelists Push For Social Security Privatization

Even after Wall Street blew up our economy and Americans got to experience their 401K's and pension funds taking massive hits due to their maleficence, some of the panel members of this Saturday's Forbes on Fox were still pushing for Social Security privatization.
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Even after Wall Street blew up our economy and Americans got to experience their 401K's and pension funds taking massive hits due to their maleficence, some of the panel members of this Saturday's Forbes on Fox were still pushing for Social Security privatization.

Host David Asman started out the segment by touting Max Baucus' proposal as part of the "super committee" to limit pay increases for Social Security benefits, followed by Rick Perry's push for privatization of the system and him asking his panel for their input. All of them other than panelist Mark Tatge thought either total or partial privatization of the system, or at least raising the retirement age would be a wonderful way to "reform" Social Security. And only Tatge bothered to remind any of them that after what he saw happen to his 401K after the recent financial meltdown, maybe turning over the country's retirement security to Wall Street might not be such a good idea.

Despite the fact that we've got thousands of people out protesting and taking to the streets in the Occupy Wall Street movement because they're fed up with the greed and inequality and what the financial industry has done to the American economy, this is the kind of tripe that Fox is feeding their audience on a daily basis. Let's follow the Chilean model as we've seen GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain pushing for, or if we don't do that, let's just let everyone work until they drop dead instead.

Anything other than asking the richest one percent to pay more in taxes, because god knows we can't have that, now can we?

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