GOP Caucus Fires Staffer For Advocating Copyright Reform

The Founders didn't want indefinite copyrights because they wanted ideas and works to revert back to the public, for the enrichment of everyone. I wonder what they'd think of today's corporate lock on intellectual property: The Republican

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The Founders didn't want indefinite copyrights because they wanted ideas and works to revert back to the public, for the enrichment of everyone. I wonder what they'd think of today's corporate lock on intellectual property:

The Republican Study Committee, a caucus of Republicans in the House of Representatives, has told staffer Derek Khanna that he will be out of a job when Congress re-convenes in January. The incoming chairman of the RSC, Steve Scalise (R-LA) was approached by several Republican members of Congress who were upset about a memo Khanna wrote advocating reform of copyright law.

They asked that Khanna not be retained, and Scalise agreed to their request.

The release and subsequent retraction of Khanna's memo has made waves in tech policy circles. The document argues that the copyright regime has become too favorable to the interests of copyright holders and does not adequately serve the public interest. It advocates several key reforms, including reducing copyright terms and limiting the draconian "statutory damages" that can reach as high as $150,000 per infringing work.The memo was widely hailed by tech policy scholars and public interests advocates.

However, it raised the ire of content industry lobbyists, who applied pressure on the RSC to retract the memo. The organization did so within 24 hours of its release. Khanna's firing will only further raise the memo's profile.

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