Hardball: Graham Nash And David Crosby On Music's Ability To Amplify Public Sentiment

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Later this evening, Graham Nash, David Crosby and a host of other musicians will be headlining "Pray for Peace" concert at the National Cathedral in DC. Yesterday they sat down with Chris Matthews and discussed the changing tide over protest music in this country (remembering how the Dixie Chicks were treated) and how different public sentiment is now than it was during the Vietnam conflict.

Information about the concert tonight, courtesy of co-performer Jackson Browne:

The 6 pm prayer ceremony and 7:30 pm concert began as a collaborative effort between Graham Nash and Bishop Chane after His Holiness the Dalai Lama visited Washington National Cathedral in 2003 promoting the concept of universal responsibility. Both vowed to make Pray for Peace a reality when the Nobel Peace Prize recipient made a return visit to Washington, D.C. The Dalai Lama is to receive the Congressional Gold Medal for what Congress calls "his enduring and outstanding contributions to peace, non-violence, human rights and religious understanding" in the Capitol Rotunda on October 17, 2007.

"People of faith need to make their voices heard both within their temples, cathedrals, mosques and holy places, and beyond," says Bishop Chane. "They must take the lead in advocating for an end to violence." Graham Nash states, "To me, it has always been the most 'un-religious' of actions to kill human beings in the name of God. It is time for the religious community to help put a stop to this madness by coming together and denouncing these killings. Many religious leaders are joining us at the cathedral to literally ‘Pray for Peace.' I hope you have the courage to join us."


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