AL Lawmaker Says Teacher Pay Raises 'Against Biblical Principle,' But Not His

State Sen. Shadrack McGill I've heard a lot of insane attacks on paying teachers more money, but this one might take the cake. Shadrack McGill loves increasing legislators' salaries because somehow it'll stop corruption in politics, but you

State Sen. Shadrack McGill (application/octet-stream - 13.01 KB)

I've heard a lot of insane attacks on paying teachers more money, but this one might take the cake. Shadrack McGill loves increasing legislators' salaries because somehow it'll stop corruption in politics, but you should never raise the pay of a teacher because it will interfere with their biblical calling.

Can you understand this logic from a Bible-thumping Republican?

State Sen. Shadrack McGill defended a pay raise his predecessors in the Legislature passed, but said doubling teacher pay could lead to less-qualified educators.--

Lawmakers entered the 2007 legislative session making $30,710 a year, a rate that had not been changed in 16 years. The raise increased it to $49,500 annually.

"That played into the corruption, guys, big time," he said. "You had your higher-ranking legislators that were connected with the lobbyists making up in the millions of dollars. They weren't worried about that $30,000 paid salary they were getting," McGill said, adding that lawmakers have to pay for their expenses out of pocket.

McGill said that by paying legislators more, they're less susceptible to taking bribes.

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"He needs to make enough that he can say no, in regards to temptation. ... Teachers need to make the money that they need to make. There needs to be a balance there. If you double what you're paying education, you know what's going to happen? I've heard the comment many times, ‘Well, the quality of education's going to go up.' That's never proven to happen, guys.

"It's a Biblical principle. If you double a teacher's pay scale, you'll attract people who aren't called to teach.

"To go in and raise someone's child for eight hours a day, or many people's children for eight hours a day, requires a calling. It better be a calling in your life. I know I wouldn't want to do it, okay?

"And these teachers that are called to teach, regardless of the pay scale, they would teach. It's just in them to do. It's the ability that God give 'em. And there are also some teachers, it wouldn't matter how much you would pay them, they would still perform to the same capacity.

"If you don't keep that in balance, you're going to attract people who are not called, who don't need to be teaching our children. So, everything has a balance."

Whenever I hear a bizarre rationale given by a card-carrying member of the religious right to defend some nutty point of view I think it can't get any more insane. And then comes McGill.

In his world shouldn't these righteous state senators be compelled on biblical principles not to take bribes because it's against the ten commandments?

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