Conservatives Compare Sarah Palin To Al Sharpton. Ouch!

Here's a very bad rhyme:

It wasn't long too ago,
When Sarah ditched her igloo.
Now she's free,
Getting paid by Fox with glee
But why are Conservatives now crying?

Is comparing her to Al Sharpton very mean?
Conservatives flock to her like Charlie Sheen?
Bill Kristol has ditched her
Roger Ailes just snitched her
Oh, how the times have changed.

Al Sharpton is a favorite whipping post for the entire Conservative movement and has been for decades so you know when they start to compare her to him, things are not rosy in Moose Country.

Palin 'becoming Al Sharpton'?

Palin’s politics of grievance and group identity, according to these critics, is a betrayal of conservative principles. For decades, it was a standard line of the right that liberals cynically promoted victimhood to achieve their goals and that they practiced the politics of identity — race, sex and class—over ideas. (Related: Republicans learn cost of attacking Palin)

Among those taking aim at Palin in recent interviews with POLITICO are George F. Will, the elder statesman of conservative columnists; Peter Wehner, a top strategist in George W. Bush’s White House, and Heather Mac Donald, a leading voice with the right-leaning Manhattan Institute.

Matt Labash, a longtime writer for the Weekly Standard, said that because of Palin’s frequent appeals to victimhood and group grievance, “She’s becoming Al Sharpton, Alaska edition.”---

This year, the conservative intelligentsia doesn’t just tend to dislike Palin — many fear that her rise would represent the triumph of an intellectually empty brand of populism and the death of ideas as an engine of the right. “This is a problem for the movement,” said Will about what Palin represents. “For conservatism, because it is a creedal movement, this is a disease to which it is susceptible.”

The line of modern conservatism that can be traced back to National Review founder William F. Buckley would be broken by Palin, Will said. “There’s no Reagan without Goldwater, no Goldwater without National Review and no National Review without Buckley — and the contrast between he and Ms. Palin is obvious.” Asked if the GOP would remain the party of ideas if Palin captures the nomination, Will said: “The answer is emphatically no.”
---
Columnist Charles Krauthammer, without talking about Palin specifically, noted that “there’s healthy and unhealthy populism,” and there is concern about the rise of the latter. “When populism becomes purely anti-intellectual, it can become unhealthy and destructive,” said Krauthammer.
---
When former first lady Barbara Bush recently observed tartly that she thought Palin would be happiest staying put in Alaska rather than running for president, the former Alaska governor responded on Laura Ingraham’s radio show that the Bushes are “blue bloods who want to pick and choose their winners instead of allowing competition to pick and choose the winners.”

Then there was this morning's grim polling news:

Sarah Palin’s ratings within the Republican Party are slumping, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll, a potentially troubling sign for the former Alaska governor as she weighs whether to enter the 2012 presidential race.

For the first time in Post-ABC News polling, fewer than six in 10 Republicans and GOP-leaning independents see Palin in a favorable light, down from a stratospheric 88 percent in the days after the 2008 Republican National Convention and 70 percent as recently as October

The GOP Grand Poobahs really don't want her to run for President, because they know the Republican primary will turn into a Tea Party donnybrook.

Can it get much worse for her when Roger Ailes lets it be known that he's unhappy with her too?

Before Sarah Palin posted her infamous “Blood Libel” video on Facebook on January 12, she placed a call to Fox News chairman Roger Ailes. In the wake of the Tucson massacre, Palin was fuming that the media was blaming her heated rhetoric for the actions of a madman that left six people dead and thirteen others injured, including Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords.

Palin told Ailes she wanted to respond, according to a person with knowledge of the call. It wasn’t fair the media was making this about her. Ailes told Palin that she should stay quiet. “Lie low,” he said. “There’s no need to inject yourself into the story.”
Palin told Ailes that other people had given her that same advice. Her lawyer Bob Barnett is said to have cautioned her about getting involved. The consensus in some corners of Palin's camp was that she faced considerable risks if she spoke out. But, this being Sarah Palin, she did it anyway.

Ailes was not pleased with her decision, which turned out to be a political debacle for Palin, especially her use of the historically loaded term "blood libel" to describe the actions of the media. “The Tucson thing was horrible,” said a person familiar with Ailes’s thinking. "Before she responded, she was making herself look like a victim. She was winning. She went out and did the blood libel thing, and Roger is thinking, 'Why did you call me for advice?'”

Here's the post I wrote about her blood libel response to the criticisms she took over the target map ad: Calling it 'Blood Libel' just opens Sarah Palin to a whole new realm of well-earned criticism

Oh, lookie here....A new Al Palin posting on her Facebook page which is titled: The $4-Per-Gallon President. For a second I thought she meant Bush. I wonder if she even wrote it?

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