ExxonMobil CEO: Fears About Climate Change Are No Big Deal, You're Just Stupid

Pay no attention to this record-breaking Texas drought! Who are you gonna believe, him or your lying eyes? I feel so much better now, don't you? ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson says fears about climate change, drilling, and energy dependence


Pay no attention to this record-breaking Texas drought!

Who are you gonna believe, him or your lying eyes? I feel so much better now, don't you?

ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson says fears about climate change, drilling, and energy dependence are overblown.

In a speech Wednesday, Tillerson acknowledged that burning of fossil fuels is warming the planet, but said society will be able to adapt. The risks of oil and gas drilling are well understood and can be mitigated, he said. And dependence on other nations for oil is not a concern as long as access to supply is certain, he said.

Tillerson blamed a public that is "illiterate" in science and math, a "lazy" press, and advocacy groups that "manufacture fear" for energy misconceptions in a speech at the Council on Foreign Relations.

I wonder if this "life threatening" heat wave warning for most of the United Statesis also our imagination. Also, those stupid hippie socialists at Lloyd's of London seems to think there's a connection between global warming and increasing number of catastrophes.

And this:

In the past week, 1,011 records have been broken around the country, including 251 new daily high temperature records on Tuesday.

Those numbers might seem big, but they're hard to put into context — the National Climatic Data Center has only been tracking the daily numbers broken for a little more than a year, said Derek Arndt, head of climate monitoring at the center.

Still, it's impressive, given that records usually aren't broken until the scorching months of July and August. If forecasts hold, more records could fall in the coming days in the central and western parts of the country, places accustomed to sweating out the summer.

The current U.S. heat wave "is bad now by our current definition of bad," said University of Victoria climate scientist Andrew Weaver, but "our definition of bad changes. What we see now will be far more common in the years ahead."


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