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Concrete Fails To Plug Fukushima Nuke Leak. Now What?

In news all too reminiscent of the BP oil explosion, it looks like this nuclear crisis is going to drag on and on -- thanks to a history of failing to meet safety standards and industry-friendly regulators -- just like here! The operator of

In news all too reminiscent of the BP oil explosion, it looks like this nuclear crisis is going to drag on and on -- thanks to a history of failing to meet safety standards and industry-friendly regulators -- just like here!

The operator of the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant said Saturday that highly radioactive water was leaking from a pit near a reactor into the ocean, which may partially explain the high levels of radioactivity that have been found in seawater off the coast.

Tokyo Electric Power Co. said it had detected an 8-inch crack in the concrete pit holding power cables near reactor No. 2 and was working to seal the fracture. Tepco said the water was coming directly from the reactor and the radiation level was 1,000 millisieverts an hour. The annual limit of radiation exposure allowed for Fukushima workers is 250 millisieverts.

Workers pumped cement into the shaft Saturday, but by the end of the day, the flow of water into the ocean had not diminished. Engineers speculated that the water was preventing the cement from setting, allowing it to be washed away.

Tepco officials said that on Sunday morning they would explore using a polymer — a type of quick-setting plastic — to plug the leak.

After spraying thousands of tons of water on the reactors at Fukushima over the last three weeks to keep the facility from overheating and releasing dangerous amounts of radiation over a wide area, the utility is faced with the problem of great volumes of contaminated water.

With storage tanks at the facility nearing capacity, Tepco is contemplating storing the water in a giant artificial floating island offshore, Kyodo news reported. Tepco, which has been monitoring radiation levels in seawater just offshore from the plant, said it would begin sampling about nine miles off the coast.

Workers have also been spraying the grounds of the plant with a polymer in an attempt to prevent any radioactive isotopes that have been deposited there from escaping from the vicinity of the plant. The polymer acts like a kind of super-glue, binding any contaminants to the soil so they cannot be blown away.

Meanwhile, here across the ocean, atomic forensics experts are piecing together the clues to figure out exactly what's going on.

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