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Bye Bye, Michele! Policy Change Coming At The DEA?

“Hopefully this is a sign that the Reefer Madness era is coming to an end at the DEA,” said Mason Tvert, the director on communications at the Marijuana Policy Project.
Bye Bye, Michele! Policy Change Coming At The DEA?
Image from: bostonherald.com

My personal theory is, they will never completely legalize marijuana because too many "black budget" covert ops are funded through illegal drug profits. But that's just me, and I hope I'm wrong:

Drug Enforcement Agency chair Michele Leonhart was done in by her agents’ unsanctioned, cartel-funded sex parties in Colombia, but it’s marijuana legalization advocates who are excited to see her go.

“Hopefully this is a sign that the Reefer Madness era is coming to an end at the DEA,” said Mason Tvert, the director on communications at the Marijuana Policy Project. “Michelle Leonhart has maintained an opinion about marijuana akin to the opinion people had back in the 30s.”

As Bloomberg reported, Attorney General Eric Holder said a statement that Leonhart will step down in May, after a Department of Justice watchdog report found that several agents were involved in inappropriate behavior, and a majority of lawmakers on the House Oversight committee voted to express they had “no confidence” in her leadership. Given the chance, marijuana policy activists—opposed to her strict opposition to both recreational and medicinal marijuana—would have voted her out several years ago. Now, they're hoping for someone who, like President Obama, is interested in a more science focused response to drug policy.

“This is a very exciting moment for the Drug Policy Reform movement,” Tom Angell, the founder of Marijuana Majority, told Bloomberg. “We’ve been basically working towards her resignation or firing or removal by other means as head of the DEA since the president, for some reason, decided to appoint her.”

Angell said that advocates were disappointed and shocked that Obama reappointed Leonhart—a holdover from the Bush administration—to the job in 2010. Since then she's taken a very firm anti-marijuana stance that has alienated supporters of less strict drug laws. In 2011 she was criticized for saying that increased drug war violence in Mexico, including the deaths of over a 1,000 children, was “a sign of success in the fight against drugs.” During a 2012 House Judiciary subcommittee hearing, Leonhart refused to say whether marijuana is safer than crack.


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