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Jeb Bush Struts Before The NRA Over 'Stand Your Ground' Law

The dead black kids left in its wake? Meh.

One thing I'll grant the right wing. They're completely shameless about crowing over their major achievements which generally involve situations reasonably expected to end in death.

Pander Bear Jebbie appeared before the NRA Friday to brag about what a good gun nut he is and why the NRA should love him lots. When he got around to crowing about Stand Your Ground, I could Stand No More.

"And we built on [the Castle Doctrine], with the principle that you can stand your ground. In Florida, you can defend yourself anywhere you have a legal right to be, if you reasonably believe you're in danger of death or injury or rape or kidnapping," Jeb said.

Well, that's true unless you're black and your name is Trayvon Martin or Marissa Alexander. Then you either die or go to prison. But of course, Jeb doesn't wish to speak of these things unless he's in a quiet room somewhere where no one is listening.

"This is a sensible law that other states have adopted because you shouldn't have to choose between being attacked or going to jail," declared the candidate.

Also true, though it ignores ALEC and also that women in danger of being beaten by their husbands or black kids coming back from the convenience store do not enjoy the same protections as their attackers and killers.

Jeb finished by saying, "The only thing you should have to worry about is keeping yourself and your loved ones safe."

Unless, of course, you're a black teenager or an abused spouse. I know I sound like a broken record, but the law's reciprocity seems to evaporate when people of color defend themselves or their loved ones.

I hope someone asks the former Florida governor about that during a debate.


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