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C&L's Sat Nite Chiller Theater: 'The Virgin Spring' (1960)

Please join us and check out Ingmar Bergman's horrifying movie about violence and vengeance.

You wouldn't normally categorize an Ingmar Bergman film as a horror movie, but what happens in this film is horrifying on not only a physical level, but on a spiritual one well as.

Wes Craven based his brutal The Last House On The Left on this tale of unspeakable violence and wavering faith.

The film caused quite a stir back in the day. In 1960, Bosley Crowther of the NY Times wrote:

It is a straight equating of violence and revenge, of brutality and compassion or—to reduce it to simplest terms—of evil and good. The film, called "Jungfrukallan" in Sweden, opened at the Beekman last night. It might be termed a morality play, so direct and uncomplicated is it.

But for all its directness and simplicity—its barrenness of plot and perplexities—it is far from an easy picture to watch or entirely commend. For Mr. Bergman has stocked it with scenes of brutality that, for sheer unrestrained realism, may leave one sickened and stunned. As much as they may contribute to the forcefulness of the theme, they tend to disturb the senses out of proportion to the dramatic good they do. However much one may welcome an easier clarity in a Bergman theme, there is a point beyond which the sophistication of the artist may be reduced with peril.

Doesn't that make you want to see it all the more?

Bergman is one of may favorite directors so I hope you enjoy a little chill tonight.

Extras: Check out this interview Wes Craven did with NPR's Terry Gross. She wanted to know why he took on such a violent project to begin with.


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