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Jerry Nadler: 'Hope Hicks Gave Us A Lot Of Useful Information'

Rep. David Cicilline said Hicks was asked about the president's alleged relationship with former Playmate Karen McDougal although he did not say how she answered.
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Rep. Jerry Nadler said yesterday that the House Intelligence committee did obtain useful information from Hope Hicks that did not involve her work in the White House.

NADLER: Hope Hicks answered some questions. She gave us a lot of good information. The White House asserted so-called absolute immunity, which is ridiculous, which we will destroy in court.

Hicks did answer some questions about her time on the campaign including Russia interference and Wikileaks references in meetings, Lawrence O'Donnell said.

"Democratic Congressman David Cicilline said she was asked about the president's alleged relationship with Karen McDougal, although he did not say how she answered. A transcript could be released in 48 hours. Leading off our discussion is Eric Swalwell of California and a House intelligence committee member and also a Democratic candidate for president.

"How much of what the committee wanted to hear did the committee get to hear?" O'Donnell asked.

"I was a part of that interview team today. What we saw principally was just how far the president is willing to go to protect the country from knowing what he did with the Russians and what he did to obstruct the investigation into that and show us what he is willing to do to obstruct Congress and a witness in Ms. Hick, who I interviewed and who hasn't changed," Swalwell said.

"She was quite forthcoming in some ways. She has a deep knowledge and a front row seat to what the president and candidate Trump did, but also she knows where the red lines are. That's where she stops and refuses to answer. I think it's important for us to see where the red lines are for the Trump team and work around them and the subpoenas and document requests we send out. We are going to get to the truth whether they want to tell us now or later."

"Let's listen to what Madeline Dean said about it," O'Donnell said.

DEAN: I asked her about communications with Russians or Russian officials. She tried to say that there were no communications whatsoever. When i asked more specifically, she said probably an e-mail or more. She didn't think they were relevant. I tried to impress upon the witness it was not up to her to decide what was relevant. We wanted the facts and the truth before the American people. I had stonewalling there.

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"Congressman Swalwell, did she say anything about that part and the questioning about contacts and activities during the campaign and did she say anything that was different from what she appeared to say in the Mueller report?" O'Donnell asked.

"I will characterize it this way. She knew what she was not supposed to say. Her memory would be foggy or she would refuse to answer. She wouldn't really go into the Mueller report, citing it as a time she was at the White House. What this shows me is how guilty this gang is," Swalwell said.

"Innocent people don't come in and act this way. Innocent presidents don't tell aides or former aides to go in and put up walls around what you can say. Innocent people say 'You know what? We didn't do anything wrong, so you go in there and tell them everything we did and we will be cleared. That's not what we've seen, and that's not what we will see."

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