Shaniqua Davis, a fast food worker in New York City, talks about the struggles she faces trying to raise a family on the federally mandated minimum wage of $7.25 an hour.
August 29, 2013

Shaniqua Davis, a fast food worker in New York City, talks about the struggles she faces trying to raise a family on the federally mandated minimum wage of $7.25 an hour. She plans to participate in a nationwide strike scheduled for Thursday.

Via:

Shaniqua Davis, 20, lives in the Bronx with her boyfriend, who is unemployed, and their 1-year-old daughter. Davis has worked at a McDonald's a few blocks from her apartment for the past three months, earning $7.25 an hour. Her schedule varies, but she never gets close to 40 hours a week. "Forty? Never. They refuse to let you get to that (many) hours."

Her weekly paycheck is $150 or much lower. "One of my paychecks, I only got $71 on there. So I wasn't able to do much with that. My daughter needs stuff, I need to get stuff for my apartment," said Davis, who plans to take part in the strike Thursday.

She pays the rent with public assistance but struggles to afford food, diapers, subway and taxi fares, cable TV and other expenses with her paycheck.

"It's really hard," she said. "If I didn't have public assistance to help me out, I think I would have been out on the street already with the money I make at McDonald's."

Fast-food workers are planning walkouts in dozens of cities to pressure chains like Taco Bell, McDonald’s, and Wendy’s to pay higher wages. Organizers claim Thursday’s strike will be the largest ever by fast-food workers. Employees are demanding $15 an hour, for a full-time-employee yearly salary of $31,000, more than double the federal minimum wage ($7.25 an hour, or $15,000 yearly).

The National Restaurant Association says the low wages reflect the fact that most fast-food workers tend to be younger and have little work experience. Scott DeFife, a spokesman for the group, says that doubling wages would hurt job creation, noting that fast-food chains are already facing higher costs for ingredients, as well as new regulations that will require them to pay more in health care costs.

In reality, few of these workers are teenagers. Most have to support their families. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median age of fast-food workers is over 28; and women, who comprise two-thirds of the industry, are over 32. The median age of big-box retail workers is over 30. These workers typically bring in half their family’s earnings.

They deserve a raise.

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