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Everything The Occupation Needs To Know About Winter Camping

Thanks to C&L OccuPies, we have a lot of new Occupy readers. So when I ran across this incredibly useful blog post by Milwaukee blogger Drew Jacob over at Rogue Priest, I wanted to make sure a wider audience saw it - especially the part about the

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Thanks to C&L OccuPies, we have a lot of new Occupy readers. So when I ran across this incredibly useful blog post by Milwaukee blogger Drew Jacob over at Rogue Priest, I wanted to make sure a wider audience saw it - especially the part about the Sacred Dry Socks. If you're in for the duration, be sure to read the whole thing:

One of the issues pressing the occupation is the reality of holding a piece of ground round-the-clock (it is an occupation, after all) in October and, soon, November. Milwaukee occupiers have been forced to relocate; Minnesota protesters, who face an even colder winter, have been told they can’t use tents. When you’re outside and exposed, winter survival is a safety issue of Valley Forge proportions.

I’ve spent quite a bit of time living in the snow, and I’ve written this post as a how-to. If you’re holding the line in the name of the 99%, thank you for what you do. I hope this advice will help keep you healthy and on your feet (fingers and toes intact).

When you set up a camp in the winter months, location is everything. Many Occupations have already launched, and they’ll have to make the most of the current site. Others are still in the planning stages, and should take the lay of the land into consideration.

If you are still planning: There are many things you want from your site: visibility, accessibility, and a hope of avoiding arrest. None of these mean anything if you can’t sleep at night from the cold.

Wind and shelter are two of your biggest considerations. In most areas, winter winds come from the north, but be aware of your local weather patterns. An ideal location (in a city) will be a low-lying area with taller buildings on all sides, especially the side the winter wind comes from. Hedges and evergreen trees provide surprisingly effective wind blocks; fences do not. Scout your location on foot and pay attention to whether it seems less windy than the surrounding streets.

Elevated areas are terrible for winter camping. Don’t choose high ground. Likewise, areas that channel wind (such as long, narrow parks or malls) will be miserable.

Lots more useful information. Did you know you'll be better off sleeping on a pile of pine boughs than you would in a blow-up mattress? Neither did I!

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