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Lying florida blues I saw an article in The Gainesville Sun this morning about nonverbal indicators of lying and deception. An excerpt: According to

Lying florida blues

I saw an article in The Gainesville Sun this morning about nonverbal indicators of lying and deception. An excerpt:

According to Dr. David Givens, director of the Center for Nonverbal Studies, whose research aims to find reliable signs of deception: "(Rafael) Palmeiro's verbal deception was counterbalanced by his nonverbal communications. One of the best signals of deception with gestures is when hand gestures seem normal and then there is a sudden stepping up of hand gestures." In Palmeiro's case, he directed a series of finger-pointing gestures toward his accusers. The sympathetic nervous system (which controls involuntary expression), became aroused in Palmeiro, which led to his display of agitation and discomfort, says Givens. Finger-pointing typically is a gesture of anger used in deception, according to Givens. Conversely, when a person is telling the truth, they are generally calmer and more confident in themselves, says Givens. One exception is sociopaths, who do not feel sympathy or guilt and possess little conscience, says Givens. There are also differences between how people present big lies as opposed to small lies, according to Givens. If cooking up a big fib, a person can become so fearful that his or her body movements shut down to the point where they exhibit no hand gestures. A small lie can generally be detected through tone of voice, which might indicate a lack of conviction on the deceiver's part, says Givens.

When people are gripped by an initial fear of being caught in a lie, they generally illustrate what's called a "fight or flight" response, where people's primal or survival instincts kick in from the threat of a perceived attack, and the body responds by giving off chemical or electrical signals they cannot suppress, again revealing signs of unconscious deception. These nonverbal cues can involve sweaty palms, higher blinking rates and breathing rates, bristling hair and squaring the torso or angling away, according to Givens. this morning about nonverbal indicators of lying and deception. An excerpt:

According to Dr. David Givens, director of the Center for Nonverbal Studies, whose research aims to find reliable signs of deception: "(Rafael) Palmeiro's verbal deception was counterbalanced by his nonverbal communications. One of the best signals of deception with gestures is when hand gestures seem normal and then there is a sudden stepping up of hand gestures." In Palmeiro's case, he directed a series of finger-pointing gestures toward his accusers. The sympathetic nervous system (which controls involuntary expression), became aroused in Palmeiro, which led to his display of agitation and discomfort, says Givens. Finger-pointing typically is a gesture of anger used in deception, according to Givens. Conversely, when a person is telling the truth, they are generally calmer and more confident in themselves, says Givens. One exception is sociopaths, who do not feel sympathy or guilt and possess little conscience, says Givens. There are also differences between how people present big lies as opposed to small lies, according to Givens. If cooking up a big fib, a person can become so fearful that his or her body movements shut down to the point where they exhibit no hand gestures. A small lie can generally be detected through tone of voice, which might indicate a lack of conviction on the deceiver's part, says Givens.

When people are gripped by an initial fear of being caught in a lie, they generally illustrate what's called a "fight or flight" response, where people's primal or survival instincts kick in from the threat of a perceived attack, and the body responds by giving off chemical or electrical signals they cannot suppress, again revealing signs of unconscious deception. These nonverbal cues can involve sweaty palms, higher blinking rates and breathing rates, bristling hair and squaring the torso or angling away, according to Givens.
Well, I think the sociopath part explains Dick Cheney pretty well. As for Bush, it's pretty simple. To quote an old joke:

How do you tell when Bush is lying?
When his lips move.

FACTCHECK.ORG COULD USE A GOOD FACTCHECKER        Bitch Ph.D.

Factcheck.org’s analysis of the television advertisement released by NARAL Pro-Choice America on August 8, 2005 is deeply flawed, and its conclusion that the “ad is false” is unsubstantiated and should be retracted.

The analysis, written by Matthew Barge, identified as a recent college graduate(1), is riddled with legal and factual errors and in many instances virtually mirrors the White House’s talking points. One might disagree with the opinions stated in the ad or even have a different view of how John Roberts’ role in a particular case should be characterized; however, every factual statement made in NARAL Pro-Choice America’s ad is completely accurate and supported by objective documents. The ad is not “false.” John Roberts did indeed file briefs supporting violent fringe groups, with the effect of excusing their actions by helping to remove a crucial legal remedy that had been the most effective tool against them.

Well, I think the sociopath part explains Dick Cheney pretty well. As for Bush, it's pretty simple. To quote an old joke:

How do you tell when Bush is lying?
When his lips move.

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