The U.S. Department of Defense ended a little-known arrangement that for years allowed the tech billionaires to travel on sharply discounted jet fuel bought from the Pentagon.
September 13, 2013

googlejet_0
Credit: Flickr

The Wall Street Journal reports that "the U.S. Department of Defense ended a little-known arrangement that for years allowed the tech billionaires to travel on sharply discounted jet fuel bought from the Pentagon." The entire deal, quietly scrapped after congressional pressure from Senator Chuck Grassley, was a little governmental quid pro quo:

"The cheap fuel for the Google executives came courtesy of a special agreement with NASA, whose Ames Research Center is based at Moffett Federal Airfield, a former U.S. Navy base that is the most convenient airport to Google's Mountain View, Calif., headquarters, about three miles away.

Although Moffett is closed to most non-government traffic, NASA in 2007 signed a deal allowing H211 LLC, a private company representing jets owned by the Google founders and Google Chairman Eric Schmidt, to base aircraft at Moffett. The fleet recently included seven jets and two helicopters. H211 agreed to pay about $1.3 million in annual rent and cost recovery, while Google separately is leasing some Moffett land for a future office campus."

The Google fleet conducted a few "scientific experiments" that made up a tiny minority of fuel gallons burned. Many other subsidized flights were made on official Google business. But there's still plenty of rich-guy jetsetting, the WSJ notes, including trips to Croatia, Fiji, Nantucket, Puerto Rico, Las Vegas, Martha's Vineyard, and other destinations you'd expect from a wealthy CEO with a $15 million penthouse for um, "entertaining" women who are not your wife.

I suppose being a multi-billionaire comes with its' perks, but at least use your own damn billions.

Help Us Fight Back Against Social Media Censorship

Facebook has been limiting the visibility of our posts after a serious of bogus violations. We need your help now more than ever.

Discussion

We are currently migrating to Disqus

On May 14, 2022, we started migrating our comments from Insticator back to Disqus. During this transition period, some posts will have Insticator and some Disqus. For more information on the transition, as well as information regarding old C&L accounts, please see this post.


We welcome relevant, respectful comments. Any comments that are sexist or in any other way deemed hateful by our staff will be deleted and constitute grounds for a ban from posting on the site. Please refer to our Terms of Service for information on our posting policy.