Snatching people off the streets. Hanging people from the ceiling. A man freezing to death alone on a concrete floor. This is the story of how the United States used its position to cajole, persuade, and strong-arm 54 other countries to take part in the CIA's post-9/11 campaign of secret detention and torture.
February 7, 2013

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Snatching people off the streets. Hanging people from the ceiling. A man freezing to death alone on a concrete floor. This is the story of how the United States used its position to cajole, persuade, and strong-arm 54 other countries to take part in the CIA's post-9/11 campaign of secret detention and torture.

After the September 11 attacks against the United States, the CIA conspired with dozens of governments to build a highly classified program of secret detention and extraordinary rendition of terrorist suspects. The program was designed to place detainee interrogations beyond the reach of law. Suspected terrorists were seized and secretly flown across national borders to be interrogated by foreign governments that used torture, or by the CIA itself in clandestine "black sites."

A new report from the Open Society Justice Initiative, Globalizing Torture: CIA Secret Detention and Extraordinary Rendition(pdf), brings together for the first time the intricate details of 136 named victims of the program. It documents how 54 different governments around the world took part in their kidnapping, detention, and often torture. It documents, in case after case, who was targeted, where they were taken, and what happened to them.

H/T George Soros, Chairman and Founder, Open Society Foundations

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