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Chris Christie Is So Tired Of Hearing About The Minimum Wage

Don't you want more for your children than the minimum wage?
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Aww! Isn't that sweet? Chris Christie wants parents to have higher aspirations for their kids than just minimum wage, mostly because he's so eager to do the bidding of the Kochs:

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) said Tuesday that he's "tired" of hearing discussion on the minimum wage and seemed to suggest that a higher minimum wage isn't something to "aspire to."

"I gotta tell you the truth, I'm tired of hearing about the minimum wage, I really am," Christie said during an event at the Chamber of Commerce in Washington, according to a recording of his remarks by the liberal opposition research group American Bridge.

"I don't think there's a mother or father sitting around a kitchen table tonight in America who are saying, 'You know honey, if my son or daughter could just make a higher minimum wage, my God, all our dreams would be realized," he added. "Is that what parents aspire to for their children?"

The governor went on to say that parents aspire to an America where their children can make more money and achieve greater success, according to The Hill. He said those aspirations weren't about a "higher minimum wage."

No, Chris, I'm sure what parents aspire to is having their son go to work as a Wall Street lobbyist, buy his way to a U.S. Attorney appointment and then lie his way into the state house!

NEWARK, N.J. — New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and his wife reported nearly $700,000 in income last year, a significant jump from 2012.

Tax returns released by his office Friday show the Christies made $698,838 in 2013. They paid $193,510 in federal and state taxes. They reported $478,977 in income in 2012.

Christie’s wife, Mary Pat, has long been the bigger income-earner in the family.

She works part-time on Wall Street and earned $475,854 for her job as a director at Angelo, Gordon & Co. and $34,698 from Cantor Fitzgerald.

The governor reported $160,054 in taxable income from the state of New Jersey.

The 99 pages of federal and state tax documents were filed with the Internal Revenue Service following a six-month extension.


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