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How Police Unions Blocked Maryland Police Reform

Despite the new measures, procedures for prosecuting police misconduct in Maryland will remain the same.
How Police Unions Blocked Maryland Police Reform

Lee Fang on how real police reform in Maryland was blocked by the police unions:

A package of police reform bills that Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan is scheduled to sign into law today, in part as a response to the death of 25-year-old Baltimore resident Freddie Gray, was weakened under political pressure from Maryland police unions, a major force in state politics.

The bills will allow police to wear body cameras, increase the liability cap for lawsuits against government employees, and encourage the state to collect more data on police behavior.But more substantial reforms, including legislation to add a civilian review process and to have state prosecutors investigate all killings by police, were shot down during a legislative hearing in Annapolis earlier this year.

So, despite the new measures, procedures for prosecuting police misconduct in Maryland will remain the same.

A recent report from the ACLU of Maryland found that at least 109 people died in police encounters in Maryland from 2010 to 2014.Freddie Gray’s death — which came after his spinal cord was severed when he was in police custody — has become the latest national symbol of brutal policing in African-American communities, and has called particular attention to the poor relations between police and residents in Baltimore.

Gray’s funeral sparked riots in Baltimore last night .In a major investigation last year, the Baltimore Sun reported that the city has paid out $5.7 million since 2011 to settle police brutality cases. In many cases, charges were never even brought. For instance in 2012, Anthony Anderson died of internal trauma after police tackled him, claiming that they saw him engage in a drug deal. Even after a medical examiner ruled that the death was a homicide as a result of being tackled, the local prosecutor declined to bring charges.


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