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Clock-Making Teen: 'I Felt Like I Was A Terrorist'

Chris Hayes had a wonderful interview with Ahmed Mohamed, the Texas boy who made a clock and got arrested.

While most of us were busy watching the interminable Republican debate last night, Chris Hayes was interviewing Ahmed Mohamed, the young man who was arrested for the sin of performing science and bringing his project to school.

The description of his interrogation was pretty sad, especially when he described how he felt.

"I felt like I was a criminal, I felt like I was a terrorist, I felt like all the names I was called. In middle school I was called a terrorist and a bombmaker just because of my race. And my religion," Mohamed answered.

Apparently they had no intention of believing anything he said.

"They asked me a couple of times if it's a bomb. I answered them both times that it's a clock."

Worst of all, when they put him in the interrogation room, they wouldn't let him call his parents, leaving him to suffer through an interrogation with no representation and no one in the room as a witness.

However, it's not all terrible news. Even though the mayor won't apologize to Ahmed or his family, others have stepped up and in a big way. The President has invited him to the White House for an astronomy night...

Twitter and Facebook have invited him to their headquarters with Twitter asking if he'd like to intern with them, and then there was this moment:

His smile is priceless there, isn't it?

This moment, though. This one was the heartbreaker for me.

"I didn't think I was going to get any support because I'm a Muslim boy."

I'm so ashamed of these people. Thank heavens others are stepping up to fill the gap and ease the sting of hateful monsters.


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