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Fox And Friends Praise Police Chief For Violating First Amendment

Fox and Friends calls it an 'epic showdown with atheists.' Patriots should call it unconstitutional.

Steve Doocy was overjoyed this morning because the Police Chief of Childress, Texas, who put 'In God We Trust' on the back of all police cruisers, told atheists to 'go fly a kite,' when they protested this violation of our First Amendment. Calling this 'an epic showdown with atheists,' Chief Adrian Garcia appeared with his Liberty Institute deputy counsel, Hiram Sasser, to explain their reasons for violating the Establishment Clause of our U.S. Constitution.

Image from: Fox News

He believes that with all the recent 'attacks' on cops, which are less numerous than other years, they need all the help they can get, even if that help is recruiting an imaginary friend to allegedly bless all the cops. Religious liberty crusader, Hiram Sasser, the attorney representing God almighty, said,

'not only is it our 'national motto,' it's in the Star Spangled Banner, a version of it, the fourth verse that we don't sing at the baseball games...it's been on our coins since 1864, it's been the official national motto since 1956 (at the height of the 'Red Scare' mind you) and it's UNDEFEATED in Federal Court...and it will probably remain undefeated for the next 200 years. (all said with a smug smile)

Doocy called the letters sent from atheist groups 'scary' and read an excerpt that he selected to arise the most outrage from his Christian viewers.

'It is frightening and politically dubious for the department to announce to citizens that officers rely on the judgement of a deity than on the judgement of the law.'

While Doocy read that statement, he made sure he added 'God' after deity, in case the viewers don't know that strange, polysyllabic word. He then cautions Garcia,

'you know another letter is going to come from these people.'

Garcia says that he expects that. Thankfully, he has the more loquacious Hiram Sasser to elaborate. He informs us about his noble organization which will be representing departments all across the nation, free of charge, because the police need to be focused on serving the community, and if they want to impose their religious beliefs on the taxpayers, then of course they will, by golly!


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The Freedom From Religion Foundation rightfully protested the insertion of the non-secular phrase on taxpayer-funded property. Patheos explains:

I reached out to the FFRF and got a quote back from Co-President Dan Barker: “There are strong winds of change in this country. Christianity is declining rapidly and the ‘nones’ are rising. We’re happy to fly a kite with the message ‘in reason we trust,’ and let the ever-strengthening winds of nonbelief take it ‘up to the highest height.’”
The lame thing about “In God We Trust” being the national motto is that it excludes people who are atheists or who aren’t monotheists from “we” – “we” that purports to encapsulate the whole American population. That’s not right.

Also, the existence of your police department undermines “In God We Trust.” If we trusted in god we wouldn’t be trying to catch criminals ourselves. In fact, it undermines “In God We Trust” every time we try to solve our problems ourselves and simultaneously bolsters “E Pluribus Unum”.

It would be far more interesting if they put 'In Allah We Trust' on the cruisers, since that is more appropriate to many Americans, including some Texans, and means exactly the same thing. If you trust in a deity (God), then what form you address 'Him' should not be relevant to that deity, plus, there is no basis in the law for doing so. If the omnipotent, omniscient and omnipresent God is ubiquitous, isn't it really irrelevant to ask for help if 'His' will is unvarying and perpetual?

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