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Seth Meyers Unravels Clinton's Ridiculous Email 'Scandal'

A comprehensive take-down of the media's favorite nontroversy.

Practically every week, we are inundated with futile attempts to reinvigorate Hillary Clinton's 'email scandal' by rival Democrats, the Mainstream Media and Republican opponents. This week's revelation was just another nothing-burger deluxe with a side of lies. Late Show host, Seth Meyers does a phenomenal job explaining this 'scandal', or as he says, 'the story that just won't die.'

Let's face it, they've got nothing new. That's because this is a problem about work rules regarding email, rather than a VIOLATION OF FEDERAL LAW!

When the 'news' surfaced earlier this week, we posted an article explaining the specifics of the latest media-driven email hysteria.

The Office of Inspector General (OIG) released its anticipated report on the State Department's handling of email and cybersecurity. Lost in the hyperbole is the fact that the OIG report was meticulous and thorough, but also dispassionate, just like any other OIG report I've read. There was no direct criticism of Clinton, sharp or otherwise. The OIG was examining the State Department's practices, not specifically investigating Clinton's actions.

The report mentions, there were no administrative penalties in place—either about the use of a private email server, or not following the established procedures for preserving emails—at the time Clinton served as Secretary of State.

Meyers devotes the right amount of ridicule to a story that warrants nothing more. He solidly emphasizes this point when he played soundbites of different broadcasters repeating that this is just more 'drip-drip-drip' from Clinton. Each minuscule revelation is either devastating to her or absolutely innocuous, depending on who's watching. Seth ties this in to Bernie Sanders with this comment:

You know if you're wondering why so many Democrats are attracted to Bernie Sanders. Bernie doesn't have any drip, drip, drips, which for a 74 year old man is pretty remarkable. It's a medical marvel!

Meyers emphasizes one of the fallacies oft reported about the investigation: the number of FBI agents that were devoted to this case was erroneously listed as 147 when the actual number was 12. Then we see several clips of Secretary Clinton admitting that she 'takes responsibility' for not maintaining two separate accounts for personal and work-related emails; so much so, Meyers predicts that it will be part of her swearing-in statement.


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It's always nice when the media begins to take note that this false hysteria has really gotten out of hand.

Meyers mocked the scandal, calling it “boring” and noting the report states other State Department officials have been reported to have used personal email accounts as well, and that the classified emails Clinton allegedly sent through her personal account did not necessarily represent an endangerment to national security — Meyers highlighted a quote from former CIA Director Michael V. Hayden who said he received a “Merry Christmas” email labeled classified. However, Meyers did conclude Clinton probably broke the rules.

It is very demoralizing that our Fourth Estate is downright desperate to legitimize this fabricated scandal. By entertaining every half-baked conspiracy theory contrived by Hillary's detractors, they reveal that they are driven by viewership and money, not integrity. What's worse is that this same media gives a free pass to her pathologically dishonest Republican opponent, a man who is perhaps the least qualified and mentally fit candidate to ever run for office in our nation's history.

The drip-drip-drip of truth in media should concern us much more than a violation of a vague workplace regulation. Thank you Seth Meyers for mocking the ridiculous.

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