Mike Pence was under pressure from Trump not to certify the electoral college votes. He turned to former vice-president Dan Quayle for advice.
September 15, 2021

There are a few surprises in "Peril," the new book by Bob Woodward and Bob Costa. One of them was about the advice Dan Quayle gave the beleaguered Mike Pence, who was under extreme duress from Trump not to certify the electoral college results. Via CNN:

Even though Pence stood up to Trump in the end, "Peril" reveals that after four years of abject loyalty, he struggled with the decision. Woodward and Costa write that Pence reached out to Dan Quayle, who had been the vice president to George H.W. Bush, seeking his advice.

Over and over, Pence asked if there was anything he could do.

"Mike, you have no flexibility on this. None. Zero. Forget it. Put it away," Quayle told him.
Pence pressed again.

"You don't know the position I'm in," he said, according to the authors.

"I do know the position you're in," Quayle responded. "I also know what the law is. You listen to the parliamentarian. That's all you do. You have no power."

Come on, admit it. Who would have believed Dan Quayle would save the country?

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