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Republicans Suggesting "Doom And Gloom" On Healthcare Reform

Looks like Mrs. King Dana Bash is doing her good duty again with another softball interview for a Republican Senator. This time around it's Orrin Hatc
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Looks like Mrs. King Dana Bash is doing her good duty again with another softball interview for a Republican Senator. This time around it's Orrin Hatch and making sure his views on how a government option for health insurance is going to mean doom and gloom for health care reform are out there unchallenged.

If Bash wanted to do her homework on the subject, I'd recommend she watch Bill Moyers Journal's segment on single payer and see what some actual journalism looks like. I'm sure in her case that's asking too much since she seems to be content repeating meaningless party lines on what should be very serious topics for CNN if they wanted to consider themselves a news organization rather than a mouth piece for the RNC or the corporate wing of either party for that matter.

What kills me with the Republicans' argument of late is how unfair they now think it is for private insurance to have to compete with a government plan. I thought no one would want that lousy socialized system forced on them?

Heaven forbid we make the system we have now, which puts profits from denying care and lining the CEO's pockets, to have to compete with one that actually has as its primary goal providing services for those that pay into it. How could we ever survive without all those insurance industry workers fighting us tooth and nail finding ways not to provide the coverage we thought we paid for so their profit margin can go up?

Orrin, I hate to break this to you, but we already have something between a patient and their doctor and it ain't the government. That would be called their insurance company.

BASH: But, even as Democratic organizers start to rally thousands of activists across the country, Republicans are firing a warning shot, calling the president's push to expand health coverage with a new government insurance option a deal-breaker.

SEN. ORRIN HATCH (R), UTAH: There are a lot of people in my party, on the Republican side, who want to work with Democrats, who want to get this done, but who are totally against public plan.

BASH: Orrin Hatch is one of nine Republicans on the powerful Senate Finance Committee who wrote the president arguing, a government-run program competing with private insurers, would -- quote -- "inevitably doom true competition."

GOP senators insist, that would jeopardize quality.

HATCH: There is no way that we can be for a public-plan option, because that will put the government between you and your doctor.

Full transcript below the fold.

BLITZER: Battle lines now appear to be hardening over an issue of major importance to all of you. That would be health care -- on the one side, Democrats, with their ideas for health reform -- on the other, Republicans suggesting doom and gloom if Democrats get their way.

Let's go straight to CNN's senior congressional correspondent, Dana Bash. She's working the story on Capitol Hill.

What's going on, Dana?

DANA BASH, CNN SENIOR CONGRESSIONAL CORRESPONDENT: Well, you know, for months, Wolf, there really has been a genuine bipartisan effort among key players trying to tackle this complex issue of reforming our health care system. But the atmosphere is now changing fast, as we are seeing details of Democrats' plans.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I do want to thank you so much for coming.

BASH (voice-over): In this Virginia living room...

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: This is a time in history when there may be a chance to change things.

BASH: ... President Obama's foot soldiers recruiting grassroots help for his looming battle -- health care reform.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP, ORGANIZING FOR AMERICA AD)

BARACK OBAMA, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES: To get this done, I need your voice to be part of the debate.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BASH: But, even as Democratic organizers start to rally thousands of activists across the country, Republicans are firing a warning shot, calling the president's push to expand health coverage with a new government insurance option a deal-breaker.

SEN. ORRIN HATCH (R), UTAH: There are a lot of people in my party, on the Republican side, who want to work with Democrats, who want to get this done, but who are totally against public plan.

BASH: Orrin Hatch is one of nine Republicans on the powerful Senate Finance Committee who wrote the president arguing, a government-run program competing with private insurers, would -- quote -- "inevitably doom true competition."

GOP senators insist, that would jeopardize quality.

HATCH: There is no way that we can be for a public-plan option, because that will put the government between you and your doctor.

BASH: But many Democrats, from the president on down, argue, Americans will benefit from a public plan that gives private insurers competition.

SEN. TOM HARKIN (D), IOWA: It is both about coverage and cost, because we believe, you know, with a public-option plan, that will act as a crosscheck on the insurance companies. And I think that's a good thing.

BASH: So far, Ted Kennedy is the only key Democrat to draft health care legislation. It would require all Americans to have health insurance and create a government-run insurance program that would offer essential benefits, including doctor and hospital care and prescription drugs.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

BASH: Now, most Democrats say they like Kennedy's plan, but most also know that it has virtually no chance of getting bipartisan support.

So, more moderate Democratic senators are trying to work on a plan that does allow for a public option, but perhaps to scale it back a little bit, with the hopes of maybe getting some Republicans on board, Wolf. And the idea would to -- be to put guarantees in to make sure that a public plan would compete fairly with private insurance companies -- Wolf.

BLITZER: This debate is only just beginning. It's going to be hot this summer.

Thank you, Dana.

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