First Draft Here's a little gem of a poll Dan Froomkin mentioned Wednesday: The number of US university students who hold traditional liberal views
April 21, 2005

The number of US university students who hold traditional liberal views increased sharply over the past year, pushed by excitement over the 2004 election and dissatisfaction with George W. Bush's foreign policy, according to a Harvard University poll released yesterday.

[snip]

It found that 43 per cent of college students fell in the liberal category - supportive of health insurance and abortion rights while opposing Mr Bush's foreign policy - up 11 percentage points from one year ago. Some 14 per cent of college students were described as traditional conservatives and 21 per cent as religious centrists, who hold moderate views that are influenced by religion. So-called secular centrists, who lean towards conservatism but are not influenced by religion, fell from 29 per cent to 18 per cent.

The students were worried about Social Security, with 70 per cent concerned that the pension system may not be there when they retire. They are more supportive of the kind of private investment accounts that Mr Bush has proposed than the broader public, but by a slim majority thinks Congress should place more emphasis on "guarantees" than on "personal control".

Support for the war in Iraq has dropped markedly, from 65 per cent in April 2003 to 44 per cent today.

What do you know? He is a uniter!

 

I agree with Karl Rove     The Next Left
The number of US university students who hold traditional liberal views increased sharply over the past year, pushed by excitement over the 2004 election and dissatisfaction with George W. Bush's foreign policy, according to a Harvard University poll released yesterday.

[snip]

It found that 43 per cent of college students fell in the liberal category - supportive of health insurance and abortion rights while opposing Mr Bush's foreign policy - up 11 percentage points from one year ago. Some 14 per cent of college students were described as traditional conservatives and 21 per cent as religious centrists, who hold moderate views that are influenced by religion. So-called secular centrists, who lean towards conservatism but are not influenced by religion, fell from 29 per cent to 18 per cent.

The students were worried about Social Security, with 70 per cent concerned that the pension system may not be there when they retire. They are more supportive of the kind of private investment accounts that Mr Bush has proposed than the broader public, but by a slim majority thinks Congress should place more emphasis on "guarantees" than on "personal control".

Support for the war in Iraq has dropped markedly, from 65 per cent in April 2003 to 44 per cent today.

What do you know? He is a uniter!

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