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Goldman Sachs Helped Greece Evade Legal Debt Limits Through Currency Swaps

Not that Goldman Sachs is the only vampire squid bank out there pushing global governments to the brink for their own profit, but I thought this was instructive. By the way, this is only a variation on the same thing bankers have done with U.S.

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Not that Goldman Sachs is the only vampire squid bank out there pushing global governments to the brink for their own profit, but I thought this was instructive. By the way, this is only a variation on the same thing bankers have done with U.S. cities and states on their pension obligations. My advice: If you're introduced to a banker, spit on the ground at his feet. You can't be charged with assault, but it gets the message across!

Now, though, it looks like the Greek figure jugglers have been even more brazen than was previously thought. "Around 2002 in particular, various investment banks offered complex financial products with which governments could push part of their liabilities into the future," one insider recalled, adding that Mediterranean countries had snapped up such products.

Greece's debt managers agreed a huge deal with the savvy bankers of US investment bank Goldman Sachs at the start of 2002. The deal involved so-called cross-currency swaps in which government debt issued in dollars and yen was swapped for euro debt for a certain period -- to be exchanged back into the original currencies at a later date.

But in the Greek case the US bankers devised a special kind of swap with fictional exchange rates. That enabled Greece to receive a far higher sum than the actual euro market value of 10 billion dollars or yen. In that way Goldman Sachs secretly arranged additional credit of up to $1 billion for the Greeks.

This credit disguised as a swap didn't show up in the Greek debt statistics. Eurostat's reporting rules don't comprehensively record transactions involving financial derivatives. "The Maastricht rules can be circumvented quite legally through swaps," says a German derivatives dealer.

In previous years, Italy used a similar trick to mask its true debt with the help of a different US bank. In 2002 the Greek deficit amounted to 1.2 percent of GDP. After Eurostat reviewed the data in September 2004, the ratio had to be revised up to 3.7 percent. According to today's records, it stands at 5.2 percent.

At some point Greece will have to pay up for its swap transactions, and that will impact its deficit. The bond maturities range between 10 and 15 years.

Goldman Sachs charged a hefty commission for the deal and sold the swaps on to a Greek bank in 2005 while Henry Paulson was CEO.

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