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Marco Rubio Doubles Down On Abortion Stance On 'Meet The Press'

'If I'm going to err, I'm going to err on the side of life.' Even if I've supported certain exceptions in the past. I am not afraid to pander to the fringe of my party.
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Chuck Todd asked GOP Presidential contender, Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida, if he'll support legislation on abortion that has exceptions. Dodging the real question, Rubio replies,

'I'll support any legislation that reduces the number of abortions, that means a 20 week abortion ban.'

He admits rape is horrifying but the number of abortions due to rape is less than 1%. He feels that the medical assistance available (not everywhere of course) will prevent the need for ANY abortions.

He's skirting the real question, which I'm sure many women would like to know if they would have to carry a baby to term that was conceived under duress and violent conditions. He just wants the number of abortions to drop significantly, but he never mentions the half million or so abortions that are prevented by Planned Parenthood, which he and his buddies want to obliterate.

If you recall, he denied that he said that he would support abortions under certain exceptions during the Thursday GOP Debate. Now that debate season is under way, he is saying that is, and always has been, his position. But we have this thing called the internet that quickly settles any questions on what was and wasn't said, so why didn't Chuck Todd ask him more specifically about his bill from 2013?

Yes, that's right, in 2013, Marco Rubio co-sponsored a bill that allowed for exceptions due to rape and incest and now he's changing his tune about what he once proposed.

Under the plan reportedly being proposed by Rubio, a woman would be unable to get an abortion beyond 20 weeks gestation. And though the bill does include exceptions in cases of rape, incest, and if the life of the mother is at risk, it doesn’t appear to make exceptions if a woman’s health is at stake.

The foundation for this legislation is a scientifically disputed idea that fetuses can feel pain after 20 weeks. It is the same motivation that has driven such bans at the state level. Most recently, Texas has taken the national spotlight for its proposed 20-week ban, and eight other states have passed ‘fetal pain’ laws.


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Remember, it's not Chuck Todd's job to ask tough questions. It's his job to keep his guests happy and coming back for more softball interviews.

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