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MSNBC Launches New Digital Outlet -- And Luke Russert Has His Own Show!

I'm sure you're as excited as I am.
MSNBC Launches New Digital Outlet -- And Luke Russert Has His Own Show!
Image from: programwitch

Not a bad idea in theory, but... Luke Russert? Really, Phil? You want to hitch your wagon to that particular star? I think millenials are too savvy for Lil Luke's chronic false equivalencies. You should at least try to find some young talents who actually have some:

MSNBC is getting ready to debut a new show about sports. And one focused on books. And another that will examine celebrity and popular culture. In all, the NBCUniversal-owned cable-news network has 14 new programs ready to roll. You won’t see any of them on MSNBC. At least, not yet.

The cable-news outlet best known for progressive commentary from Rachel Maddow and Chris Hayes is launching a portal of streaming-video programming that its top executive, Phil Griffin, expects to have a great deal of influence on the cable network in months to come. Through the new digital initiative, known as “Shift by MSNBC,” the network will serve up new topics and introduce new contributors that could gradually make their way to the cable network, Griffin believes – depending on the traction they gain among audiences.

“Shift” is expected to launch Monday morning.

“We’ve got to keep evolving,” he explained during a conversation in his office at NBCUniversal’s 30 Rockefeller Center headquarters. “We are going to broaden the aperture, but keep the sensibility. Times change and evolve. We had great success in 2006 to 2012, 2013, with our sensibility, but I think now, with the media exploding, we’ve got to adjust a little bit too, and figure out new ways to grab audiences.” Among the new offerings is “The Briefing,” a political program hosted Monday and Fridays by Luke Russert, and “Code Forward,” a discussion of issues raised by new technology, developed in partnership with the tech-news outlet Re/Code.

The launch comes as MSNBC pushes against the same headwinds rivals are facing: Cable-news ratings have over the long term sunk as viewers turn to mobile devices and digital techniques to get information about their world. Replenishing this crowd with younger viewers becomes tough when millennials and the generation behind them seem more comfortable with streaming video that does not require a subscription to a satellite or cable distributor. Last month, MSNBC saw its total viewership fall 13% and its audience in the demo most favored by advertisers in news programming — people between 25 and 54 — tumble 16%, according to Nielsen. In 2013, the network saw its primetime audience decline 24%, according to analysis from the Pew Research Journalism Project.


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“Shift” will serve to lure people making one of their own. According to Pew, the “vast majority” of U.S. consumers get news via digital means. In 2013, 82% of Americans said they got news on a desktop or laptop and 54% said they got news on a mobile device, according to Pew’s “State of the News Media 2014.” What’s more, 35% said they accessed news “frequently” on their desktop or laptop, and 21% indicated they did the same using a mobile device.

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