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Sen. Mike Lee 'Certain' That The 'Next Congress' Will Look Into Trump's Financial Ties To Saudis

Meet the Press host Chuck Todd couldn't be bothered to ask Utah Sen. Mike Lee whether or not the Senate was going to do their oversight duties along with the House and look into Trump's financial ties to the Saudis.
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Following Trump's extremely callous response to the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, and his dismissal of the CIA assessment which said that there was "high confidence" that Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ordered that murder, it's become painfully obvious that there very well may be financial motivations behind Trump's willingness to cover for the Saudis.

Meet the Press host Chuck Todd asked Utah Sen. Mike Lee about Trump's refusal to hold MSB responsible for the murder, saying "maybe the world should be held accountable because the world is a vicious place" and The Washington Post publisher Fred Ryan's response, calling the dismissal "A clear and dangerous message has been sent to tyrants around the world."

While Lee did tell Todd he disagreed with Trump's response, he also basically admitted that they're going to be punting their oversight responsibilities to look into the matter to the Democrats when they take over the House next session, saying the "next Congress" would be looking into any conflicts Trump has. Todd couldn't be bothered to ask Lee whether the Senate would finally start taking their oversight duties seriously, and why they haven't done just that already.

TODD: Is it fair to ask the question, what is the president's motives behind siding with the Saudis and is it, should Congress look in to see if he's got financial motivations into why he might be siding with the Saudis over the C.I.A.?

LEE: Look, I don't know why he's siding with the Saudis. But I think there are things we can do to change our relationship with the Saudis, notwithstanding whatever his personal motivations might be. I'm also certain that in the next Congress, people will look into that.

But again, I think Congress has to take some ownership of U.S. foreign policy, especially as it relates to our intervention in this war. Our unconstitutional fighting of a civil war in Yemen that has never been declared by the U.S. Congress is a problem. And that's on us.


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